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2011.08.22 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Ebbe Sloth Andersen awarded a Sapere Aude grant from The Danish Council for Independent Research

The Sapere Aude research career programme finances research projects of the "highest quality". The programme's main purpose is to pave a clear career path for elite scientists from research growth layers and give them a springboard to seek funds from international councils and foundations. Sapere Aude means "dare to know". The grant, which runs…

Figure 1: Newly identified human exosome co-factors. hMtr4 is a key protein that connects the human RNA exosome to its co-factor complexes. The two auxiliary complexes detected in this study are found in the nucleoplasm and the nucleolus, and are important for the recognition of RNA substrates in these cellular locations. See text for details. Figure layout: Michal Lubas

2011.08.19 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

New protein complexes shed light on quality control in human cells

Researchers at Aarhus University have identified and characterised two novel protein complexes associated with the human RNA exosome, an important player in the cell's quality control of RNA. The new protein complexes will help determine how RNA molecules are discriminated by the cell, and the discovery, which is published in the prestigious…

Two of the scientists who discovered the origin of a new group of small RNAs that contain genetic information. From left: Peter Refsing Andersen and Torben Heick Jensen. Click photo for enlargement. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen
Figure. Proposed mechanism for the generation of a class of short RNAs. (Left) RNA polymerase (RNAPII) (grey blob) copies DNA (black line) into mRNA (red line) while advancing in the direction of the orange block arrow. Upon arrest (‘Boing!’) – possibly as the result of a collision with a DNA-bound protein – RNAPII can disengage from the DNA before completion of mRNA production (right), resulting in the RNA being attacked from their 5’-end by the degradation enzymes XRN1 and/or XRN2 (purple packman). Only the portion of the RNA that is protected inside RNAPII remains intact and can be detected experimentally. Figure: Pascal Preker

2011.08.08 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Millions of small RNAs paint a bigger picture of human gene activity

Scientists have discovered the origin of a new group of small RNAs (sRNAs) that contain genetic information. This discovery can lead to a better understanding of how human genes are controlled, and with this knowledge, scientists might one day be able to regulate some of the genes that cause various diseases.