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[Translate to English:] Gregers Rom Andersen, AU foto

2011.10.24 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Great international recognition of Gregers Rom Andersen

Associate Professor Gregers Rom Andersen, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, has achieved great international recognition with his nomination as a member of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO). The election to EMBO is a recognition of Gregers Rom Andersen’s excellent research within structural biology.

In collaboration with an Australian research group, the Danish researchers (left: Jørgen Kjems, Sune B. Villadsen, Jesper B. Bramsen, Thomas Birkballe Hansen) have characterised a hitherto unknown and revolutionary way by which cells can regulate the formation of proteins. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen
Figure. Speculative model for the regulation of the CDR1 mRNA level using miRNA and circular RNA. 1) In the absence of miRNA, the circular RNA (black) protects the CDR1 mRNA (green) against degradation. 2) The expression of miRNA (red) results in cleavage and degradation of the circular RNA. 3) The degradation of the circular RNA leads to a separation of CDR1 mRNA and circular RNA, which in turn makes the mRNA vulnerable to degradation. Figure: Thomas BirkBalle Hansen

2011.10.17 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

New research provides a better understanding of the regulation of our genes

In collaboration with an Australian research group, a research team at Aarhus University has characterised a hitherto unknown and revolutionary way by which cells can regulate the formation of proteins. This involves an overlooked circular RNA molecule in human cells and a well-known microRNA. The discovery may contribute to a better understanding…

Associate Professor Christian Kroun Damgaard in front of the gradient and fractionation unit that was used to study the translation of cellular "messenger molecules" (see text for details). Click photo for enlargement. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen
Figure: 5'TOP mRNAs localise in large cytoplasmic "RNA-granules" during nutrient starvation. The image shows RNA-fluorescent in situ hybridisation (RNA-FISH) analysis of a 5'TOP mRNA in human cancer cells. The image is a combination of three individual images, showing the staining of nuclei (blue), TIA-1 tagged with green fluorescent protein (green), which is a marker for "stress granules" (SGs), and staining of 5'TOP mRNA (red). Compartments where both the 5'TOP mRNA and TIA-1 localise (SGs) therefore appear yellow. Figure: Christian Kroun Damgaard

2011.10.17 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

New knowledge about cellular stress response

In a joint effort, a researcher from Aarhus University and an American researcher have uncovered how a specific network of “messenger molecules” are inhibited simultaneously in the cell during cellular stress. These findings contribute to the understanding of how the cell regulates networks of genes during cellular stress and could eventually…