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Atomic model of the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex exhibiting a barbell-like structure. When strong x-ray is applied on the protein crystals, the radiation is diffracted. By measuring the intensity of diffracted radiation a 3-dimensional map of the atoms can be generated leading to a final model. Click for enlargement

2012.08.31 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Aarhus researchers solve mystery in blood

This week, a Nature paper entitled "Structure of the haptoglobin–haemoglobin complex" is authored by an interdisciplinary crowd of researchers from AU. Associate Professor Gregers Rom Andersen from MBG contributed to the project by determining the crystal structure of the haptoglobin–haemoglobin complex.

2012.08.27 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

DKK 15 millioner for a new membrane centre at Aarhus University

A group of researchers at AU have been granted DKK 15 million to create a new research centre to study the body's membrane proteins. The following researchers from the Dept. of Molecular Biology and Genetics participate in the centre: Gregers Rom Andersen, Rune Hartmann, Lene Niemann Nejsum, Poul Nissen, Claus Oxvig og Lea Thøgersen.

In collaboration with French scientists, PhD student Thomas B. Kallehauge (right) and Professor Torben Heick Jensen shed light on a phenomenon where the export of mRNA is corrupted. The study shows that mRNA retained in nuclear dots is translationally active and that such dots may function as nuclear storage sites for immature mRNA (Photo: Estelle Marchal).

2012.08.24 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

mRNA quality control mechanism prevents contamination of cells

Researchers from Aarhus University have just disclosed a new quality control mechanism that prevents contamination of cells with aberrant mRNA. This helps us to understand how mRNA quality control can act in a precautionary way to avoid the cellular spreading of toxic molecules.

Figure 1. The researchers have used the carnivorous plant the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) for their research which has resulted in the so far most comprehensive analysis of the protein composition in the digestive juice of a carnivorous plant, which contribute significantly to the understanding of prey digestion in these plants (Photo: Jan J. Enghild).
Figure 2: Workflow of the Venus flytrap digestive fluid analysis (Figure: Kristian Wejse Sanggard)

2012.08.17 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Prey digestion by the carnivorous Venus flytrap

A newly published study by researchers from Aarhus University provides the most comprehensive analysis to date of the protein composition in the digestive juice of a carnivorous plant, and this contributes significantly to the understanding of prey digestion in these plants. The identified, unique digestive enzymes identified by the researchers…

Professor Peter Andreasen (left) with Professor Ming Dong Huang, Director of the State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry at the Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Fuzhou, where Peter Andreasen was awarded a visiting professorship.

2012.08.10 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Peter Andreasen awarded visiting professorship in China

Professor Peter Andreasen, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, is awarded a "Visiting Professorship for Senior International Scientists of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2012".