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Scientists will breed cows that burp less methane by, among things, breeding the cow's rumen microflora. Photo: Jesper Rais

2012.11.30 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Maximum milk for minimum methane

By selectively breeding not only cows, but also their rumen bacteria, researchers intend to reduce the release of the greenhouse gas methane, while also increasing the effectiveness of the cow's milk and meat production.

A new research centre for genomics will be established at Aarhus University. Photo: Colourbox

2012.11.30 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

New research centre for genomic selection established at Aarhus University

A research centre in genomic selection is to provide new tools for use in modern breeding of plants and animals.

The research team behind the new method for diagnosing malaria. Back row from left: Charlotte Harmsen, Pia W. Jensen, Magnus Stougaard, Emil L. Kristoffersen, Rikke Frøhlich and Eskild Petersen. Front row from left: Amit Roy, Christine J. F. Nielsen, Birgitta R. Knudsen, Rodrigo Labouriau and Megan Yi-Ping Ho. Click photo and figures for enlargement (photo: Lisbeth Heilesen).
The high sensitivity is achieved by performing the REEAD technology within droplets surrounded by oil. The malaria parasites are distributed in the pico-litre droplet, where they react effectively with the other components of the REEAD technology (figure: Sissel Juul and Birgitta Knudsen).
Uninfected blood and blood infected with the malaria parasite P. falciparum. The new method amplifies the signal from the malaria parasites since each parasite can give rise to more DNA molecules using the REEAD technology. Under the microscope, each DNA product is seen as a red dot (figure: Sissel Juul and Birgitta Knudsen).

2012.11.27 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

New method for diagnosing malaria

Danish researchers have developed a new and sensitive method that makes it possible to diagnose malaria from a single drop of blood or saliva. The method might eventually be used in low-resource areas without the need for specially trained personnel, expensive equipment, clean water or electricity. With the development of this method, the…

Researchers at Aarhus University have played an important role in the mapping of the pig genome. The results have far-reaching practical implications for pig research and breeding and are an important building block for research into human diseases. Photo: Colourbox.

2012.11.15 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

The genetic code of the pig has been broken

Researchers at Aarhus University have played an important role in the mapping of the pig genome. The results have far-reaching practical implications for pig research and breeding and are an important building block for research into human diseases.

The international research team behind the results revealing new fundamental features of biomolecular interactions that enable plants to identify and respond appropriately to microorganisms. Back row, left: Mikkel B. Thygesen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Søren S. Thirup (Aarhus University, Denmark), middle row: Jens Stougaard (Aarhus University, Denmark), Knud J. Jensen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Clive W. Ronson (University of Otago, New Zealand) and front row: Mickaël Blaise (Aarhus University, Denmark), Nicolai Maolanon (University of Copenhagen, Denmark) and Maria Vinther (Aarhus University, Denmark) (photo: Lisbeth Heilesen). Click photos and figures for enlargement.
First author: Angelique Broghammer (Aarhus University, Denmark) (photo: Lisbeth Heilesen).
Figure 1. Binding of Nod factor to the receptor proteins can be shown by surface plasmon resonance. A chip was established which contained glucose, chitin and Nod factor in different flow cells (Fc). Glucose was used as a reference. When the receptor proteins are passed over the different ligands on the chips, binding was only observed to Nod factor. The response increased with higher concentrations of receptor proteins, and by plotting the response values against the receptor, concentration binding constants could be determined (figure: Angelique Broghammer).
Figure 2. Chemically modified Nod factor molecule. 
Nod factors were isolated from the supernatant of a rhizobia culture, purified by HPLC and identified by MS.  A fluorescent label (Alexa546) was attached to the purified Nod factor by chemoselective chemistry (figure: Angelique Broghammer).
Figur 3. Bindingsassay med fluorescensmærket Nod-faktor.
1) Binding af oprenset receptorprotein til agarose-beads. Receptorproteinet udtrykkes med et GFP-mærke, og binding kan observeres ved mikroskopi. 2) Lysmikroskopi af agarose-beads. 3) Binding af fluorescensmærket Nod-faktor til receptorproteinet. 4) Overlejring af billede 1 og 3 viser, at Nod-faktor binder til det immobiliserede receptorprotein (figure: Angelique Broghammer).

2012.11.01 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Plants recognise pathogenic and beneficial microorganisms

In collaboration with national and international experts, researchers from Aarhus University have revealed new fundamental features of biomolecular interactions that enable plants to identify and respond appropriately to microorganisms. The new results provide a better understanding of the mechanisms governing the ability of plants to interact…