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Spider silk can be very useful for humans – all we need is to find out the trick. Photo: Colourbox
In collaboration with an international team of researchers, Daniel Otzen has published insight into how the proteins in a spider’s silk gland join together to form strong threads. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen

2014.02.25 | Public / media

Spider silk is acid

In collaboration with an international team of researchers, Professor Daniel Otzen, iNANO and MBG, has come closer to the ‘recipe’ for spider silk. The liquid protein material in the abdomen of the spider gradually becomes more and more acidic as it approaches the spinnerets.

The grain from the genetically modified barley is manually harvested using scissors. All other plant material apart from the ears is then collected in containers and sent for incineration. After the harvest, the field is sprayed with Roundup to kill all seedlings produced from spilt grain. Photo: Inger Holme

2014.02.27 | Public / media

Conventional breeding and genetic engineering go hand in hand

People, the environment and farm animals can benefit from cereals that have been bred to contain larger amounts of phytase – an enzyme that increases the availability of phosphate and other minerals. Conventional plant breeding methods cannot stand alone, but may be combined with the process of cisgenesis.

Daniel Otzen (left) and four other researchers with the EliteForsk Award presented by her Royal Highness Pricess Mary and Minister for Educationand Research Sofie Carsten Nielsen (Photo: the Danish Research Council)
Daniel Otzen and students looking at FTIR spectra of fibrils in the protein alpha-synuclein (Photo: Martin Kurnik)
Bacteria with fibrils (Photo: Gunna Kristiansen – the colours are applied)

2014.02.06 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Origami at the molecular level

Professor Daniel Otzen has been awarded an EliteForsk Award for his contribution to the understanding of protein behaviour and its significance for folding in particular.