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Researchers from Aarhus University will develop dairy cattle breeds that are specially suited to organic production. Photo: Janne Hansen

2015.01.26 | Grant, Knowledge exchange

Breeding for organic dairy production

A new project is set to benefit organic dairy production, partly by developing breeds of cows that are better suited to organic production and partly by creating niche dairy products based on knowledge of the cows' breeding characteristics.

2015.01.15 | Grant

Molecular Biology and Genetics researchers awarded considerable strategic funds

In the latest appropriation round, researchers at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics were awarded no fewer than three out of ten grants by the Programme Committee for Health, Food and Welfare under the Danish Council for Strategic Research (DSF).

Assistant Professor Stig Uggerhøj Andersen was awarded a grant of DKK 17 million from the Innovation Fund Denmark to increase the amount of nitrogen in organic farming. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen.
The researchers will study the correlation between clover yields and the genetic composition of the three components of the nitrogen cycle – soil bacteria, clover and grass. Photo: Colourbox.

2015.01.15 | Grant, Knowledge exchange

Enough nitrogen for organic farming

One of the major challenges in organic farming is maintaining a positive balance in the nitrogen cycle. Nitrogen is an important nutrient for plants, but it is removed from the soil whenever crops are harvested. It can therefore be difficult to maintain a sufficiently high level of accessible nitrogen in the soil without using artificial…

Associate Professor Henrik Brinch-Pedersen has been awarded a grant of DKK 12.3 million by the Innovation Fund Denmark to develop natural food colouring. Photo: Charlotte Hamann Knudsen.
To meet the increasing demand for natural food colours, the research team intends to increase the content of the natural colorant anthocyanin in black carrots. Photo: Bjarne Jørnsgaard, Chr Hansen.

2015.01.15 | Grant, Knowledge exchange

Developing natural food colouring

A number of synthetic food colours have been shown to have undesirable side effects, especially in children. Since 2010, the EU has demanded that selected synthetic dyes should be labelled, and there is a major world demand for natural food colours. Associate Professor Henrik Brinch-Pedersen has been awarded a grant of DKK 12.3 million by the…

Anders Olsen has been awarded DKK 10 million from the Innovation Fund Denmark to find out why some bacteria are healthy and some harmful. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen.
The researchers use the simple and popular nematode (roundworm) <em>C. elegans</em> in their studies. Because it is so small (1.2 mm) and has a short generation time (3 days), it is extremely well suited to this type of study. Photo: Anders Olsen.

2015.01.15 | Grant, Knowledge exchange

Worms and health-promoting bacteria

A research collaboration between Aarhus University, SSI (State Serum Institute) and DuPont will find out why some bacteria are healthy and some harmful. A worm measuring 1.2 mm that feeds on bacteria will help provide the answers. The Innovation Fund Denmark has invested in the project by awarding a grant of DKK 10 million to Anders Olsen.

Professor Jørgen Kjems, the new director of iNANO. Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Communication

2015.01.13 | People

Jørgen Kjems appointed director of iNANO

Professor Jørgen Kjems has been appointed director of the Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Centre (iNANO) for a three-year period. He has been an integrated part of the management at the centre for a number of years, both as a founding member of iNANO and as acting director since 2014.

The co-occurrence of the NEXT complex and an accessible RNA 3’end drives an early RNA exosome decay. The NEXT complex, via its RNA-binding component RBM7, physically contacts RNAs early during their cellular lifecycle (1). NEXT binding does not automatically lead to decay by the exosome (2a), but the presence of NEXT provides the possibility for exosomal degradation, which can only occur upon emergence of an unprotected RNA 3’end (2b). One group of newly discovered NEXT substrates are metabolites of intronic snoRNA production events (3).

2015.01.08 | Research

How to target the RNA decay machinery

In collaboration with two other European groups, researchers from Aarhus University have uncovered molecular details leading to targetting of the major RNA decay machinery, the RNA exosome, to its nuclear RNA substrates. Studies can now be designed to address the role of this early nuclear RNA decay pathway in processes where rapid RNA decay may…

By sequencing the genome of the bowhead whale, an international research team with Danish participation has identified a number of genes that may protect the whale against age-related diseases and cancer. Photo: Adam Schmedes.
Photos from the researchers' scientific article on the front page of the prestigious journal <em>Cell Reports</em>. http://www.cell.com/cell-reports/issue?pii=S2211-1247%2814%29X0026-4

2015.01.07 | Research

The genome of the bowhead whale sequenced

By sequencing the genome of the bowhead whale, an international research team with Danish participation has identified a number of genes that may protect the whale against age-related diseases and cancer.

PhD student Ewa Terczynska-Dyla and Associate Professor Rune Hartmann show new research results which suggest that it is possible to develop new treatment for hepatitis targetting the individual patient. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen.

2015.01.05 | Research

Genes show the way to better treatment of hepatitis C

One of the most common causes of hepatitis C (formerly known as infectious hepatitis) is a hepatitis C virus infection in the liver. The disease can be treated, but not all patients are cured by the treatment currently available. New research shows that the response to medical treatment depends on genetic factors.