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A certain gene variant has a major influence on the composition of the gut flora in the pig. This can impact the need for using antibiotics. Photo: Janne Hansen

2016.03.16 | Research

Can we use genetic variations to reduce the use of antibiotics?

Selection for pigs with genes for healthy intestinal flora may be able to reduce agriculture’s use of antibiotics and thus reduce the problems of antibiotic resistance. New knowledge paves the way for this opportunity.

Danish researchers have discovered that mitochondria from mistletoe contain only 10 genes. This discovery will ultimately lead to a better understanding of how mitochondria function and not least how the interaction between parasite and host functions. Photo: Colourbox.
Mistletoe (Viscum album) is a shrub that grows on other plants as a parasite (Photo: Colourbox). Photo: Colourbox.

2016.03.17 | Research

Remember the mistletoe!

Danish researchers have discovered that mitochondria from mistletoe contain only 10 genes. This discovery will ultimately lead to a better understanding of how mitochondria function and not least how the interaction between parasite and host functions. This discovery could be very important if we can use the knowledge to fight the massive loss of…

Ebbe Sloth Andersen, age 39, assistant professor at iNANO and the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, has been researching nanostructures since 2007, and his ERC grant will support the further development of the RNA origami technique. Photo: Lars Kruse.
The RNA double helix is one of the building blocks of RNA origami, a method for creating nanostructures in complex, predefined forms. The blueprints for RNA origamis are shown in white in the background. Illustration: Cody Geary.
The image shows one of the stages in an RNA origami, where the enzyme RNA-polymerase triggers the folding of the nanostructure encoded in the DNA. When the nanostructures have formed, they organise themselves into a hexagonal crystal. Illustration: Cody Geary.
The paper figures are created by Ebbe Sloth Andersen to visualise the difference between the RNA origami and DNA origami methods. Whereas RNA origami is folded of a single strand of RNA, just as an origami crane is folded out of a single piece of paper, DNA origami is folded out of a strand of DNA and hundreds of staple strands, as if staples were used to fold a paper crane. Photo: Ebbe Sloth Andersen.

2016.03.02 | Grant

EUR 2 million grant to RNA origami research

Assistant professor Ebbe Sloth Andersen from MBG and iNANO has received EUR 2 million from the European Research Council (ERC). This grant will help him bring biological nanostructure research into a new phase in the field of synthetic biology – a field which may ultimately have enormous significance for the medicine, energy, food and agriculture…