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The Director Ib Henriksen Foundation’s Researcher Award 2016 goes to Professor Poul Nissen Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Foto.

2016.11.23 | Awards

The Director Ib Henriksen Foundation’s Researcher Award 2016 goes to Professor Poul Nissen

Professor Poul Nissen has won the prestigious Director Ib Henriksen Foundation’s Researcher Award 2016 for his outstanding efforts in structural biology. The foundation justifies the choice of Professor Nissen with his ability to promote interdisciplinary and international cooperation in his field of research.

Images depicting <em>Lotus japonicus</em> wild-type (a) and nodule symbiosis-deficient mutant plants: lhk1-1 (b), nfr5-3 (c), nin-2(d) following harvest. For nodulating genotypes (a and b), insets present close-up view of nodules. Scale bars correspond to 1 cm. Photos: Rafal Zgadzaj, Section for Plant Molecular Biology, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, AU.

2016.11.21 | Research

Nitrogen fixing symbiosis is crucial for legume plant microbiome assembly

New findings from the study of legumes have identified an unknown role of nitrogen fixation symbiosis on plant root-associated microbiome, which agriculture may benefit from in the future.

Corneal dystrophy is an eye disease causing protein deposits in the cornea leading to decreased or complete lack of vision. The existing treatment options are not sustainable, and therefore it would be ideal if there were other non-surgically ways to treat the disease, and this is exactly what a team of researchers from Aarhus University and Aalborg University Hospital have joined forces to find. Photo: Eung Kweon Kim, Department of Ophthalmology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.

2016.11.16 | Grant

Researchers intend to find a better treatment for corneal dystrophy

Corneal dystrophy is an eye disease causing protein deposits in the cornea leading to decreased or complete lack of vision. The existing treatment options are not sustainable, and therefore Danish researchers intend to find a better and long lasting treatment for the disease.

Models of NEXT- and PAXT-dependent nuclear RNA decay assemblies. Schematic comparison of protein-protein links within the NEXT complex (left) and the PAXT connection (right). While both NEXT and PAXT pathways appear capable of detecting capped RNA by virtue of their physical linkages to the CBC, the different RNA binding proteins (RBM7 for NEXT and PABPN1 for PAXT) discriminate their specificities. Question mark indicates that the ZFC3H1-PABPN1 linkage might not be direct.

2016.11.07 | Research

Newly discovered RNA decay pathway inside human nuclei

Genomes are promiscuously transcribed into RNA. However, not all of this material is immediately useful, which means it has to be targeted and degraded in order to sustain cellular life. A newly discovered RNA decay pathway functioning inside human nuclei does just that.