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Figure caption: Left: Unsharpened (transparent light blue) and sharpened (solid) cryo-EM density maps of human TRPM4 in nanodiscs as viewed from the side. The ion channel is composed by four domains which are colored in each their solid color. Middle: Ribbon diagram of human TRPM4. A calcium binding site belonging to one of the monomers is marked with a box. Right: A zoom-in on the calcium binding site with the coordinating residues represented by sticks and their helices in ribbons. The ribbon diagram is overlaid with the densities of the calcium structure (gray mesh) and the difference density (blue mesh) between the calcium-bound structure and the calcium-free structure. Figure: Henriette Autzen.
Henriette Elisabeth Autzen, who is employed as a postdoc at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University in Denmark, is stationed at the University of California, San Francisco, USA, where she and her American colleagues have published their determination of two structures of the human calcium-activated cation channel, TRPM4, in <em>Science</em>. Photo: University of California, San Francisco.

2017.12.15 | Research

A Channel in the Heart of the Matter

How cells control the movement of ions, electrically charged species, in and out of the cell is a grand puzzle, whose completion will allow a thorough fundamental understanding of human physiology. A Danish-American team of researchers has found a piece of the puzzle with their determination of two structures of the human calcium-activated cation…

Bill Gates (on the right side of the table, in the middle) listening to the researcher’s plans for their research. The head of the project from Aarhus University, Professor Jens Stougaard, is seen on the left side of the table, 2nd from the left. Photo: ©Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation/Alain Brin.

2017.12.11 | Research, Knowledge exchange

Bill Gates met with researchers from Aarhus University

Bill Gates recently met with researchers from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University to discuss the sustainable use of biological nitrogen fixation that allows legumes to use atmospheric dinitrogen as a nitrogen source.