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Scientists have developed a wheat with a specific ability to increase the digestibility of phosphorus and other important minerals. Photo: Janne Hansen

2017.03.30 | Research, Knowledge exchange

Unique wheat passes the test

A unique, patented wheat can have significant importance to agriculture, the environment and undernourished people in developing countries. Animal tests recently demonstrated that this special wheat increases P and Ca digestibility.

The picture at the top shows a sperm cell with the head (cell body) and tail (also known as flagellum or cilium) that propels the sperm cell forward. The schematic in the middle shows how dynein motors (yellow stars) are transported via intraflagelar transport (IFT) and periodically distributed. The picture at the bottom illustrates how the ODA16 structure functions as an adaptor between the transport system and the dynein motors.

2017.03.27 | Research

Transport of molecular motors into cilia

Molecular motors produce the force that powers the beat of sperm cell tails to generate movement toward the egg cell for fertilization. New research now shows how the molecular motors that power the movement of sperm cells are recognized and specifically transported into the tail region of the cell. This knowledge can pave the way for a better…

The RedHill team assembled in Denmark. From left to right: Terry F. Plasse (MD, Medical Director, ReHill Biopharma), Danielle T. Abramson (Ph.D., Director, Intellectual Property and Research, RedHill Biopharma), Mark L. Levitt, (MD, Ph.D., Medical Director, Oncology, RedHill Biopharma), Emil Oldenburg (M.Sc., Scientific Assistant, Aarhus University), Christine R. Schar (Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow, Aarhus University) and Jan K. Jensen (Ph.D., Project Manager, Aarhus University).

2017.03.23 | Grant, Knowledge exchange

Danish researchers and Israeli biopharmaceutical company collaborate to develop anti-cancer drugs

The Israeli Biopharmaceutical company RedHill Biopharma Ltd. (NASDAQ: RDHL) (Tel-Aviv Stock Exchange: RDHL) has extended its collaboration with researchers at Aarhus University in order to develop a potentially promising drug candidate for cancer treatment. The drug candidate is based on a protease inhibitor molecule - an area the Danish…

Model for monitoring and repairing damaged DNA (left figure). The crystal structure of the DNA control protein Rad26 that is responsible for bringing the Rad3 kinase to damaged DNA and starting repair signalling (right figure).

2017.03.20 | Research

Structural knowledge of the DNA repair complex

New Danish research provides mechanistic insight into how DNA is monitored and repaired if damage occurs. The results may eventually help to improve the treatment of certain types of cancer, as the DNA repair complex provides a mechanism for cancer cells to resist chemotherapy.

Model for RNA fate decisions: Early during its production by PolII, the CBC-bound cap of the emerging RNA is contacted by ‘productive’ (PHAX) and ‘destructive’ (ZC3H18) factors. These proteins form mutually exclusive complexes with the CBC until a ‘decision point’ (e.g. a terminator) is encountered by PolII, after which RNA fate is determined by stable interaction with either PHAX or ZC3H18.

2017.03.15 | Research

Sorting RNA for production or decay

Our genomes are promiscuously transcribed into RNA. How cells manage to sort this massive genomic output into functional and non-functional material has remained enigmatic. New research describes protein interactions involved in such RNA fate determination.

Adult zebrafish in the zebrafish facility at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Denmark. Zebrafish in the wild are found in northeastern India, Bangladesh and Nepal in standing and slow flowing water in ditches, rice fields and ponds. The Latin name Danio reportedly comes from the word Dhani, which is Bengali for "from the rice fields." Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen.
The zebrafish facility at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Denmark. Zebrafish take up less space on the shelves than mice. Photo: Kasper Kjær-Sørensen. Click photos for enlargement.
Zebrafish embryos are transparent. Here is a 24-hour old embryo as it appears in an ordinary light microscope. In addition to external structures such as yolk sac, head and eye, you can also see the brain, the inner ear and the V-shaped somites, which are the precursors of the V-shaped skeletal muscle. Photo: Kasper Kjær-Sørensen.
A 72-hour old transgenic embryo with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the endothelial cells lining blood and lymphatic vessels. All vessels are clearly highlighted in the living body. Note that due to the high density of vessels surrounding the gills, the underside of the head appears overexposed in the image. Photo: Kasper Kjær-Sørensen.
Microinjection in newly fertilized embryos. The depicted embryos are about 30 minutes old. The first cell being formed can be seen at the bottom of the embryo near the top of the image. Photo: Kasper Kjær-Sørensen.

2017.03.03 | Research

The zebrafish is an important animal model

Humans and zebrafish have more in common than you would think. Therefore, zebrafish are used more and more, for example, to study the function of genes, to create animal models for human diseases and to develop new human drugs.