Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

News

News

NFRe contributes to nitrogen-fixing symbiotic signalling. In the presence of native soil rhizobia, wild-type plants (WT) are larger, have more shoots (arrow), more flowers and formed pods (arrowhead), while nfre mutant plants are shorter, and have just started to develop flowers, indicating a lower fitness. Photo: Murakami Ei-ichi and Simona Radutoiu.

2018.07.04 | Research

New receptor involved in symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia identified

Legumes are able to grow in nitrogen-poor soils due to their ability to engage in symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. There is a great interest in using the knowledge about this symbiosis, to enable transfer to other non-symbiotic plants. An international research team has come a step further to understanding this complex biological process.

Schematic representation of the albumin molecule engaging with the neonatal FcRn receptor. Graphics supplied by Albumedix Ltd.

2018.07.03 | Research, Knowledge exchange

New cancer target identified for albumin enabled anti-cancer therapeutics

Researchers from the NanoPharmaceutical Lab at the Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) Aarhus University led by Associate Professor Ken Howard, together with researchers from Albumedix Ltd., have identified a novel target in several cancer types that may pave the way for efficient delivery of drugs into cancer cells using the blood…