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Polarised human melanoma cells in suspension. The picture to the left shows a fluorescence microscopic image showing polar distribution of the protein ezrin (displayed in yellow), and the actin cytoskeleton (displayed in magenta). The cell nucleus is shown in cyan. The picture to the right shows a thin section transmission electron microscopy image revealing strong polar folding of the plasma membrane, which makes the pole "sticky" and enhances cell attachment. Figure: Anna Lorentzen.

2018.02.28 | Research

How polarisation helps tumour cells metastasise

An international research team identifies single-cell polarity as a feature of circulating tumour cells that helps cells to leave circulation and found metastases. The novel results provide a new potential target in the fight against metastatic cancer.

Researchers from Aarhus University have identified DNA variants that affect udder health in cows. Photo: Colourbox

2018.02.28 | Research

Data from milking can be used to promote cow health

Technology on the dairy farm can be used to improve the genetic evaluation of dairy cow milking traits and thus improve the animals’ health and welfare.

Kjeld A. Marcker. Photo: Anne Marcker

2018.02.26 | People

Professor Kjeld Marcker - one of the major pioneers of molecular biology – died

Together with Nobel Laureate Fred Sanger, Kjeld Marcker revealed that protein synthesis initiation was dependent on a completely different mechanism than expected, as all proteins were synthesised using a very special methionine initiator tRNA. Also, Kjeld Marcker's research group was the first to clone and determine the DNA sequence of the gene…

An international research team might have found a drug that can be used as treatment against Alzheimer’s disease. Figure: Yujun Hou, NIA, NIH.

2018.02.06 | Research

Nicotinamide Riboside – a new promising treatment against Alzheimer’s Disease

By treating different mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease with a precursor of NAD+, which is a central coenzyme in the metabolism of the cell, an international research team might have found a drug that can be used as treatment against Alzheimer’s disease. Treatment of Alzheimer’s disease mice improved their neuronal function, memory and learning…

Jørgen Kjems. Photo: Novo Nordisk Foundation.

2018.01.31 | Awards

Jørgen Kjems awarded the Novo Nordisk Prize 2018

Jørgen Kjems, professor at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and iNANO, receives the Novo Nordisk Prize 2018 for his interdisciplinary pioneering studies of how the DNA's biological cousin, RNA, plays a key role in cell regulation and has a huge potential in future disease treatment.

The three recipients of the Innovation Fund Denmark's Grand Solution Prize. Left: Senior Researcher Peter Løvendahl, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Project Manager Jan Lassen, Viking Genetics and Chief Scientific Officer Henrik Bjørn Nielsen, The Technical University of Denmark. Photo: Maiken Kestner.

2018.01.29 | Awards

The Innovation Fund Denmark's Grand Solution Prize is awarded to three researchers for their breeding of climate-friendly cows

Peter Løvendahl from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University, Jan Lassen from Viking Genetics and Henrik Bjørn Nielsen from the Technical University of Denmark receive the Innovation Fund Denmark's Grand Solution Prize for the breeding of climate-friendly cows, which alone in Denmark ensures a reduced emission…

MAX-IV-laboratory at Lund, Sweden. Photo: ©ABML4.

2018.01.26 | Grant

Novo Nordisk Foundation awards DKK 255 million for establishing the world’s most powerful protein “microscope”

The Novo Nordisk Foundation is supporting the establishment of an ultra-modern research platform in Lund, Sweden. The platform will enable researchers to investigate proteins at a level of detail not previously possible and can thus form the basis for developing new drugs. Researchers from Aarhus University have had a strong impact on the…

Figure: Thomas Boesen

2018.01.24 | Grant

Nordic network in Nobel Prize–winning technology

A new Danish-Swedish research alliance wants to advance understanding of how biological molecules look and behave. With support from the Novo Nordisk Foundation and the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, scientists at four universities in Denmark and Sweden will join forces to create a Nordic network in cryo-electron microscopy, whose…

Researchers have found a new mechanism in which an antibody can prevent allergic reactions in a broad range of patients. It is a scientific breakthrough, which could pave the way for a far more effective allergy medicine.

2018.01.23 | Research

Researchers describe antibody that can stop allergic reactions

Researchers have found a new mechanism in which an antibody can prevent allergic reactions in a broad range of patients. It is a scientific breakthrough, which could pave the way for a far more effective allergy medicine.

A 3D model of the new DNA origami nanodevice - named "DNA Vault" - that can enclose an enzyme and regulate its catalytic activity. Graphics: Guido Grossi

2018.01.19 | Research

Nanovault controls enzymes

Researchers from Aarhus University have now succeeded in building a nanovault of DNA strings that can control enzymes. The nanovault functions as a safe in which an enzyme can be stored away and where only a specific set of keys can shut down the enzyme again. Aarhus University has also become the headquarters of a European PhD school that will…

Esben Skipper Sørensen

2018.01.18 | People

New Professor of Bioactive Food Proteins

Esben Skipper Sørensen has been appointed professor of bioactive food proteins at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University, Denmark. The appointment is effective as of 1 January 2018

An international team of researchers has revealed a fundamental mechanism responsible for handling stress in staphylococci when they are exposed to antibiotics. Figure: Ditlev E. Brodersen.

2018.01.15 | Research

Danish researchers reveal how the MRSA bacterium handles stress

An international team of researchers has revealed a fundamental mechanism responsible for handling stress in staphylococci when they are exposed to antibiotics. It is expected that the research results eventually can be used to develop new antibiotics that circumvent such stress mechanisms.

Dual Roles of ZC3H18 in Nuclear RNA Metabolism. Schematic representation of the dual engagement of ZC3H18 in RNA transcription and decay processes.  Left: ZC3H18 interacts with the CBCA complex (CBC and the ARS2 protein) to regulate protein-coding gene transcription directly or indirectly. The question mark indicates the elusive role of the histone-interacting domain and its modification in facilitating ZC3H18 function.  Right: Short non-coding RNAs, exemplified here by 3’extended snRNAs, are targeted by ZC3H18 in a process requiring interaction with both the CBCA and NEXT complexes. Such RNA decay can also occur ZC3H18-independently via direct NEXT exosome targeting. C, CBCA-interacting domain; H, histone-interacting domain; N, NEXT-interacting domain.

2018.01.03 | Research

Researchers reveal dual role for human RNA decay factor

Researchers at Aarhus University have characterized the human RNA decay factor ZC3H18 and discovered its unanticipated role in the production of protein-coding RNA. The new study, published this week in Cell Reports, therefore reveals a double-faced activity of ZC3H18 in nuclear RNA fate decisions.

Figure caption: Left: Unsharpened (transparent light blue) and sharpened (solid) cryo-EM density maps of human TRPM4 in nanodiscs as viewed from the side. The ion channel is composed by four domains which are colored in each their solid color. Middle: Ribbon diagram of human TRPM4. A calcium binding site belonging to one of the monomers is marked with a box. Right: A zoom-in on the calcium binding site with the coordinating residues represented by sticks and their helices in ribbons. The ribbon diagram is overlaid with the densities of the calcium structure (gray mesh) and the difference density (blue mesh) between the calcium-bound structure and the calcium-free structure. Figure: Henriette Autzen.
Henriette Elisabeth Autzen, who is employed as a postdoc at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University in Denmark, is stationed at the University of California, San Francisco, USA, where she and her American colleagues have published their determination of two structures of the human calcium-activated cation channel, TRPM4, in <em>Science</em>. Photo: University of California, San Francisco.

2017.12.15 | Research

A Channel in the Heart of the Matter

How cells control the movement of ions, electrically charged species, in and out of the cell is a grand puzzle, whose completion will allow a thorough fundamental understanding of human physiology. A Danish-American team of researchers has found a piece of the puzzle with their determination of two structures of the human calcium-activated cation…

Bill Gates (on the right side of the table, in the middle) listening to the researcher’s plans for their research. The head of the project from Aarhus University, Professor Jens Stougaard, is seen on the left side of the table, 2nd from the left. Photo: ©Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation/Alain Brin.

2017.12.11 | Research

Bill Gates met with researchers from Aarhus University

Bill Gates recently met with researchers from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University to discuss the sustainable use of biological nitrogen fixation that allows legumes to use atmospheric dinitrogen as a nitrogen source.

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