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Research in the media

Moderne forædlingsteknologi kan øge Danmarks markedsandele

Danmarks konkurrenceevne på det internationale marked for afgrødefrø kan styrkes ved hjælp af metoder, der udvikles i et nyt forskningsprojekt.

Cereals have a built-in defence against fungal attacks

Researchers at Aarhus University have identified a gene in wheat and barley that can protect the cereal from attack by the fungi Fusarium and Aspergillus.


Unique wheat passes the test

A unique, patented wheat can have significant importance to agriculture, the environment and undernourished people in developing countries. Animal tests recently demonstrated that this special wheat increases P and Ca digestibility.


Developing natural food colouring

A number of synthetic food colours have been shown to have undesirable side effects, especially in children. Since 2010, the EU has demanded that selected synthetic dyes should be labelled, and there is a major world demand for natural food colours. Associate Professor Henrik Brinch-Pedersen has been awarded a grant of DKK 12.3 million by the Innovation Fund Denmark to extract dye of black carrots.

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New professor is an expert in improving the value and quality of crop plants

Henrik Brinch-Pedersen has been appointed Professor MSO to carry out research in cultured plants using biotechnology, molecular biology and genetics at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, from 1 May 2017.


Researchers recreate wild crops for the beer of the future

Over thousands of years, barley and wheat have been bred to such an extent that the yield has been greatly improved, but the crops have also lost a number of properties that are important to survive in the wild. A new Danish research project will restore the original properties of crops to make them more robust.


Sustainability lies in the genes

Potted plants can be produced much more sustainably by using new precision breeding - instead of chemicals and GMO. The technique can also be applied to other crops.

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