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The recipients of the Young Investigator grant 2020 from VILLUM FONDEN. Dennis Kjølhede Jeppesen is number seven from the right. Photo: VILLUM FONDEN/Thomas Frandsen
Dennis Kjølhede Jeppesen (photo: private)

2020.01.24 | Grant

Dennis Kjølhede Jeppesen receives Young Investigator grant from VILLUM FONDEN

Every year, the VILLUM FONDEN supports research talent with the ambition to create their own independent research profiles, and this will now be possible for Dennis K. Jeppesen who – with a five-year grant of DKK 10 million – can return from the US to set up his own research group at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus…

<em>Lotus japonicus</em>. Photo: Niels Sandal, Aarhus University

2020.01.14 | Research

Plant genomes reveal the basis for adaptation to contrasting climates

In the face of rapid climate change, it is important that plants can adapt quickly to new conditions to ensure their survival. Using field experiments and plant genome studies, an international research team has pinpointed areas of the genome that are affected during local adaptation to contrasting climates. This new insight into local adaptation…

photo: Colourbox

2019.12.19 | Grant

Wild plants as climate change-resistant crops

Together with colleagues from the University of Copenhagen, researchers from Aarhus University will make new crops out of wild plants. Climate changes and an increasing population make it imperative to find alternatives to the crops that feed the world population today. The Novo Nordisk Foundation has given DKK 60 million to the research project…

In the future, the newly discovered mechanism will potentially enable insertion of the sensor specifically into diseased cells and may allow diagnosis at the single cell level. Figure: Rasmus Peter Thomsen/AU.
The researchers from Aarhus University behind the scientific article (from left): Rasmus P. Thomsen, Jørgen Kjems and Rasmus Schøler Sørensen. Photo: Anne Færch Nielsen/AU.

2019.12.13 | Research

Researchers create synthetic nanopores made from DNA

A scientific collaboration led by researchers at iNANO/Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University and the Department of Chemistry at the University of Copenhagen has resulted in the construction of a synthetic DNA nanopore capable of selectively translocating protein-size macromolecules across lipid bilayers.

Poul Nissen receives DKK 40 million (USD 6 million) from the Lundbeck Foundation's professor programme to conduct ground-breaking brain research. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen

2019.12.10 | Grant

Poul Nissen receives the Lundbeck Foundation's professor grant

The Lundbeck Foundation is awarding grants worth DKK 232 million (USD 34 million) to six leading neuroscientists. The LF Professorships programme is the Foundation’s largest grant allocation to date.

Bjørn Panyella Pedersen

2019.11.26 | Grant

Understanding how cholesterol enters the cell

Uptake of cholesterol needs to be tightly controlled, and too much cholesterol can lead to cardiovascular disease and other maladies. With a grant of DKK 4.5 mio from the Carlsberg Foundation, Bjørn Panyella Pedersen from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, will aim at uncovering parts of this essential process.…

With a grant from the Independent Research Fund Denmark’s Sapere Aude programme, Peter Refsing Andersen from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and AIAS, Aarhus University, will uncover the strategies used by DNA parasites to evade the genomic defence mechanisms. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen

2019.11.19 | Grant

Revealing how genes fight each other for space in the genome

Spread of DNA parasites can destroy important genes, so all forms of life have evolved genome defence mechanisms to keep the parasites in check. With a grant of DKK 6.2 mio. from the Independent Research Fund Denmark’s Sapere Aude programme, Peter Refsing Andersen from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and AIAS, Aarhus University,…

A functional link between nuclear RNA decay and transcriptional control by the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2. In the absence of PAXT-mediated RNA decay, nuclear pA+ transcripts are stabilised. Excess RNA binds and out-titrates PRC2 from chromatin, and the interaction between complex subunits is disrupted. Normal PRC2-repressed loci show decreased H3K27me3 levels and correlates with increased an increase in transcription. Figure: Will Garland/AU

2019.11.15 | Research

RNA regulation is crucial for embryonic stem cell differentiation

Nuclear RNA levels are kept in check by RNA decay factors. Now, researchers at Aarhus and Copenhagen Universities show that an excess of RNA in the nucleus can have negative effects on a crucial regulator of stem cell differentiation.

Bjørn Panyella Pedersen. Photo: AU Photo

2019.11.13 | People

Bjørn Panyella Pedersen selected as EMBO Young Investigator

MBG Group Leader Bjørn Panyella Pedersen is one of 27 researchers that have been selected to join the Young Investigators Programme of the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) in 2019. For the coming four years, he will join this prestigious network of young scientists.

Assistant Professor Lasse Sommer Kristensen, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University. Photo: Lundbeckfonden

2019.11.06 | Grant

Researcher will improve diagnoses for cancer

More knowledge about so-called circular RNA could improve the ability to make more accurate diagnoses and predict how the individual patient will respond to certain types of cancer drugs. Lasse Sommer Kristensen from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, AU, receives DKK 10 million from the Lundbeck Foundation for the project.

With this grant, Ulf Andersson Vang Ørom (to the right) hopes to identify uncharacterized RNA modifications with a role in splicing and cancer and in the long term use this knowledge to develop drugs targeted against RNA modifications. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen.

2019.10.23 | Grant

Ulf Andersson Vang Ørom receives the Lundbeck Foundation's Ascending Investigator grant of DKK 5 million

Ulf Andersson Vang Ørom from the Department of Molecular Genetics, AU, receives DKK 5 mio. (EUR 670,000) from the Lundbeck Foundation and their new grant scheme aimed at experienced researchers for projects with potential for significant scientific findings within biomedical research. The aim of the project is to identify RNA modifications with a…

The fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>) is a fantastic model organism, which has contributed to major scientific breakthroughs (photo: Torsten Nygård Kristensen, Aalborg University)
Up to three-quarters of all identified human disease genes are found in a similar version in the fruit fly, and there is also a high degree of similarity between the nervous system of humans and insects (photo: Aalborg University)

2019.10.09 | Research

Fruit flies help in the development of personalised medicine

It is common knowledge that there is a connection between our genes and the risk of developing certain diseases. In a study on fruit flies, researchers from Aarhus University and Aalborg University have found that gene mapping can also be used to predict response to a given treatment. This knowledge is crucial for the development of personalised…

Photo: Colourbox

2019.10.03 | Research

Flood-tolerant crops for the future climate

A flood can ruin a potato harvest in just 24 hours. However, by understanding the plant's defence mechanisms against flooding, it is possible to create more flood-tolerant crops that can withstand flooding. An international research team with the participation of Associate Professor Kim Hebelstrup from the Department of Molecular Biology and…

In an international collaboration, researchers from Aarhus University have now presented a completely new, ground-breaking model for the integration and incorporation of cholesterol into cells. Figure: Bjørn Panyella Pedersen/AU.

2019.09.19 | Research

Rethinking how cholesterol is integrated into cells

Cholesterol is best known in connection with cardiovascular disease, but cholesterol is also vital for many fundamental processes in the body. In an international collaboration, researchers from Aarhus University have now presented a completely new, ground-breaking model for the integration and incorporation of cholesterol into cells, with great…

Based on violet carrots, Danish researchers and a Danish company will make it possible to replace more artificial colours in food with natural colours based on vegetables. The Innovation Fund has invested almost DKK 15 million (around Euro 2 million) in the project (photo: Henrik Brinch-Pedersen/AU)

2019.09.13 | Knowledge exchange, Grant

New research project may pave the way for a farewell to artificial colours in food

Based on violet carrots, Henrik Brinch-Pedersen from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and his collaborators will make it possible to replace more artificial colours in food with natural colours based on vegetables. The Innovation Fund has invested almost DKK 15 million (around Euro 2 million) in the project.

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