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2019.06.28 | Awards

Teachers of the year

Pia Møller Martensen and Søren Kirk Amstrup were awarded the prizes as teacher of the year and the student teacher of the year 2019, respectively, at the Annual Meeting of the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics on Friday 28 June 2018.

On the raw electron micrographs (A), one can find the individual protein molecules (green boxes). By taking an average of thousands of such similarly oriented particles, one can get sharp two-dimensional images (B), from which one can calculate the protein's three-dimensional structure (C). Finally, one can interpret this result by building a model of the protein (D). Image: Milena Timcenko.

2019.06.27 | Research

Groundbreaking cryo-electron microscopy at Aarhus University reveals the first structures of a protein that maintains cell membranes

Using cutting-edge electron microscopy, researchers from Aarhus University have determined the first structures of a lipid-flippase. The discoveries provide a better understanding of the basics of how cells work and stay healthy, and can eventually increase our knowledge of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

The Plant Molecular Biology Group from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus (from left): Assistant Professor Simon Kelly, Associate Professor Simona Radutoiu, Assistant Professor Dugald Reid, Associate Professor Stig Uggerhøj Andersen, Assistant Professor Kasper Røjkjær Andersen and Professor Jens Stougaard. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen/AU.

2019.06.12 | Grant

An international research team receives EUR 27 million to develop more productive crops

As part of an international research team, plant researchers from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, AU, have been awarded EUR 27 million (DKK 203 million) from the Novo Nordisk Foundation - of which EUR 6.7 million (DKK 50 million) goes to the plant researchers from Aarhus University. The research project aims at creating basic…

At the CytoPad centre, researchers will use advanced immunization techniques to produce antibodies from mice and llamas. Click on the graphic to see it full size. Graphic: Daniel Otzen
Daniel Otzen enhances his research into Parkinsonism by DKK 10 million from the Lundbeck Foundation. Photo: Jesper Rais, AU.

2019.05.28 | Grant

DKK 10 million for research into Parkinson's disease

Daniel Otzen from the Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO)/Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics received DKK 10 million from the Lundbeck Foundation to develop new and better methods to diagnose and prevent Parkinson's disease, among other things using antibodies from llamas.

Cemre Manav (photo: the Novo Nordisk Foundation)
Recipients of a grant for studies abroad (photo: Novo Nordisk Foundation)

2019.05.21 | Grant

Young talented researcher awarded large grant from the Novo Nordisk Foundation

At a ceremony in Copenhagen, M. Cemre Manav from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University was officially awarded a 4-year postdoc grant from the Novo Nordisk Foundation. The grant is valued at Eur 535,525 (DKK 3,99 million) and will be used for a three years study in Cambridge and the fourth year back in Aarhus.

Peter Refsing Andersen (Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen(AU)

2019.05.21 | People

Peter Refsing Andersen appointed member of the Young Academy (DUA)

DUA (“Det Unge Akademi”) is a scientific academy for young talented researchers in Denmark under the auspices of the Royal Danish Society of Sciences and Letters. There are 40 members of DUA in total.

2019.05.21 | Grant

EUR 4,7 million to researchers from MBG

Independent Research Fund Denmark has granted a total of EUR 40 mill. to 64 research projects at Aarhus University. Of these, researchers from MBG have been granted as many as EUR 4,7 million.

Poul Nissen (photo: Lisbeth Heilesen/AU)

2019.04.25 | Grant

Poul Nissen receives EUR 1.34 million to study the insulin receptor

The Novo Nordisk Foundation has awarded Professor Poul Nissen a five-year grant in the form of a so-called "NNF Distinguished Investigator 2019 grant" within "Bioscience and Basic Biomedicine", which is given to researchers who have shown their ability to carry out and lead research at the very highest international level.

The figure shows how the enzyme PpnN binds pppGpp and speeds up conversion of guanylate (GMP) to its constituents ribose-5-phosphate and guanine. This enables bacteria to balance their tolerance towards antibiotics with the fitness requirements for survival (below). Ditlev E. Brodersen/AU

2019.04.23 | Research

Researchers reveal how bacteria can adapt to resist treatment by antibiotics

In a joint collaboration, researchers from Denmark and Switzerland have shown that bacteria produce a specific stress molecule, divide more slowly, and thus save energy when they are exposed to antibiotics. The new knowledge is expected to form the basis for development of a new type of antibiotics.

Structure of the calciumpump highlighting where the minor (blue spheres) and major (red spheres) differences between calciumpumps are located in the structure. With this knowledge it is possible to target specific pumps.

2019.04.11 | Research

New insights into calcium transport may help develop new drugs

A normal function of the heart and nerve system is, among other things, dependent on proper regulation of calcium in the cells. This process depends on the proper functioning of the calcium pump. New studies of the calcium pump structure give new insight into this process, which may help with the development of new drugs for treatment such as…

Dr. Hossein Mohammad-Beigi and Professor Daniel Otzen, Aarhus University, shows that a specific and widely common strain of olives excels as a natural inhibitor of Parkinson’s disease progress. (Image: Colourbox.com)

2019.04.01 | Research

Widely common olive species excel as natural inhibitor of Parkinson’s disease

The compositions of antioxidants in a certain species of olive fruits have been found to be superior in protection against Parkinson's disease. As Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, but still without a cure, this is an important finding on the way to combat this crippling condition.

For the second time in his career, Professor Jens Stougaard from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University receives an ERC Advanced Grant from the European Research Council for research in plant molecular biology. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen, AU.

2019.03.28 | Grant

Jens Stougaard receives prestigious grant from the European Research Council

For the second time in his career, Professor Jens Stougaard from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University receives an ERC Advanced Grant from the European Research Council for research in plant molecular biology. The amount awarded is EUR 2.5 million and runs over five years.

The photo shows two nodules on the root of the legume <em>Lotus japonicus</em>. This plant has symbiosis with the soil bacterium <em>Mesorhizobium loti</em>. In the symbiosis, the bacteria get carbohydrates from the plant, and the bacterium delivers fixed nitrogen to the plant. Therefore, the plant can do without nitrogen fertilizer. The bacteria are stained for the LacZ enzyme (dark blue) and the plant's nuclei are stained with DAPI. The nuclei are seen as light blue dots. You can see the bacteria in the young nodule and on the surface of the older nodule. In the research group - The Section for Plant Molecular Biology at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics - the researchers have isolated many of the plant genes necessary for the symbiosis.

2019.03.28 | Awards

Niels Sandal wins the prize for the science photo of the year 2019

The Danish National Research Foundation and videnskab.dk have invited researchers to participate in a photo competition on photos from their research. The judging committee selected Niels Sandal's photo with two nodules on the root of the leguminous plant Lotus japonicus as the science photo of 2019.

Professor Rune Hartmann (left) and Postdoc Hans Henrik Gad have - in collaboration with German and Swedish research groups - shown how a protein called IFN-λ can both fight a viral infection directly, but also boost the formation of new antibodies against the virus. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen, AU.

2019.03.19 | Research

When the immune system is multitasking

An international research team has shown how a protein called IFN-λ can both fight a viral infection directly, but also boost the formation of new antibodies against the virus. The discovery gives new important knowledge about how different parts of the immune system communicate and will make it easier to make more effective vaccines, especially…

The methane content of cow burps can be reduced and the cows' feed efficiency improved at the same time with targeted breeding. Photo: Jesper Rais

2019.02.27 | Research

Both the climate and farm economy can come out on top

With the aid of low-cost, high-capacity recording methods, dairy cattle farmers can reduce the amount of greenhouse gases that their cows burp while at the same time improving the animals’ feed efficiency.

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