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Peter Refsing Andersen (left) and Torben Heick Jensen. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen.

2014.11.20 | Research

A novel strategy to sort functional from non-functional RNA

The human genome is promiscuously transcribed yielding RNA from >75% of its DNA. It is presently intensely debated how much of this material is functional. Danish researchers have devised a method to help address this problem.

The strange plant Welwitschia mirabilis, which grows in the deserts of Namibia, is a veritable Methuselah with leaves that are 2-3 meters long. Now, researchers from Aarhus University will use the long-lived plant as a model for aging in humans. Photo: Janne Hansen.

2014.11.19 | Grant

Unlocking the secrets of Methuselah?

Some organisms can live for thousands of years, while we humans may achieve at the most 100-120 years. Researchers are delving into the cells of plants and humans to explore what it is that makes the difference.

MSc student Morten Thybo (the tall guy in the middle), who did his bachelor project at MBG, was on the winning team in the FoodTech Challenge. Photo: Tony Brøchner / MCH

2014.11.19 | Awards

Molecular Nutrition and Food Technology student on the winning team

A milk drink with purified water won the FoodTech Challenge. A bachelor student from MBG was on the winning team.

Detector Gadget is a detective made of RNA. He can study cells and molecules, and he uses fluorescent substances when detecting. Illustration: Ebbe Sloth Andersen, iNANO, Aarhus University.

2014.11.19 | Awards

Aarhus nanoscale detectives on the podium in Harvard competition

A team of BSc students from Aarhus University won two third places in the biomolecular design (BIOMOD) competition at Harvard University.

The research team from Aarhus University behind the new results (left: Professor Torben Heick-Jensen, Senior Researcher Søren Lykke-Andersen and PhD student Britt Ardal). Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen

2014.11.18 | Research

Host genes under the knife

A Danish research team has analysed the use of a particular cellular RNA degradation mechanism, which has revealed how the expression of the most complex class of genes in human cells is controlled. The study contributes to an understanding of the cell’s basic regulatory tools, and the results may eventually lead to a better understanding of the…

Schematic illustration of the MhsT transporter, which consists of many thousands of atoms shown here in a surface representation. Red and blue areas are negatively and positively charged, respectively, and grey areas are neutral. The black lines indicate where the protein is located in the cell membrane, and IN and OUT indicate the inside and outside of the cell. The enlarged panel shows the MhsT surface in a semi-transparent version, so you are viewing a centrally located Na+ ion that, in a crystallised state, achieves entry to the inside of the cell through a narrow tunnel, which opens when the transporter slams completely into the outside. The Na+ ion can now escape and, because the intracellular environment has a very low content of Na+, this drives the transporter to transport into the cell – in this case with amino acids and, for the closely related neurotransmitter transporter, with neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft. (Figure produced by Lina Malinauskaite)

2014.10.28 | Research

New knowledge about neurotransmitter pathways in the brain

Insight into transport mechanisms in brain cells is extremely important in connection with disorders such as schizophrenia, epilepsy and depression, as well as in connection with producing the right medicine. Defects in proteins responsible for the transport of neurotransmitters are actually related to psychological and neurological disorders, and…

The Danish Council for Independent Research has just awarded a grant of almost DKK 6.5 million to Associate Professor Lisbeth Schmidt Laursen, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, to study the molecular mechanisms that help ensure protection of the brain’s nerve cells. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen

2014.10.06 | Grant

Large grant for brain research

The Danish Council for Independent Research has just awarded a grant of almost DKK 6.5 million to Associate Professor Lisbeth Schmidt Laursen, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, to study the molecular mechanisms that help ensure protection of the brain’s nerve cells. In the long term, she hopes that her results will make it possible to…

Aarhus University has earned a strong international position and reputation as a research university. The university strives to continually strengthen and develop the framework and conditions for basic research and in-depth exploration, in order to ensure the continued production of significant and ground-breaking research results.

2014.09.26 | Research

World-class neuroscience centre

An international team of young top researchers is gearing up to take Danish neuroscience to new heights.

At Aarhus University, making a contribution to addressing society’s challenges through research is viewed as a natural part of our mission. In Denmark as well as internationally. To do so requires an interdisciplinary effort.

2014.09.22 | Research

Modern genetechnology helps ensure the food supply of the future

Genomic selection has revolutionised livestock breeding in Denmark. Now scientists from AU are on the brink of being able to apply detailed analyses of the genome to plant breeding. This is an important step towards ensuring a sustainable food supply for the 8 billion people who will inhabit the planet in the future.

The fifty years' anniversary of Marshall Nirenberg's presentation of the preliminary identification of all 64 codons that make up the genetic code was recently marked with a symposium to Honour the Legacy of Marshall Nirenberg. Photo: Professor Myrna Weissmann, Columbia University, USA. 
Programme for the meeting - click photos for enlargement.

2014.09.09 | Research

Fifty Years of the Genetic Code

In the fifty years since the landmark presentation of the preliminary identification of all 64 codons that make up the genetic code, the deciphering of the code has opened a universe of opportunity in scientific and medical discoveries. This accomplishment was recently marked with a symposium to Honour Marshall Nirenberg. Brian Clark was…

The MRC Laboratory for Molecular Biology  in Cambridge recently celebrated its 50th Anniversary with a meeting for 600 former and present staff members. Photo: The MRC Laboratory for Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK.
The new buildings for the MRC Laboratory for Molecular Biology (LMB) were inaugurated in 2013. Photo: The MRC Laboratory for Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK.

2014.09.09 | Research

Molecular Biology at 50 and beyond – LMB Alumni Symposium

The British Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory for Molecular Biology (LMB) in Cambridge recently celebrated its 50th Anniversary with a meeting for 600 former and present staff members. Aarhus University was represented by four former members of staff: Kjeld Marcker, Brian F.C. Clark, Peter Kristensen and Ditlev Brodersen – all now from the…

Foldning af RNA origami by a polymerase enzyme. A graphic representation of RNA nanostructures. Graphics: Cody Geary, AU.
Cody Geary (left) and Ebbe Sloth Andersen make origami from RNA helixes. Here they stand on the helix shaped stairway to their office at Aarhus Universitety. Photo: Peter F. Gammelby, AU.

2014.08.19 | Research

Scientists fold RNA origami from a single strand

RNA origami is a new method for organizing molecules on the nanoscale. Using just a single strand of RNA, many complicated shapes can be fabricated by this technique. Unlike existing methods for folding DNA molecules, RNA origamis are produced by enzymes and they simultaneously fold into pre-designed shapes. These features may allow designer RNA…

the function of the zinc pump when it forces zinc ions across the cell membrane. From left: Poul Nissen, Henriette Autzen, Oleg Sitsel, Tetyana Klymchuk, Pontus Gourdon, Anna Marie Nielsen and Kaituo Wang (Photo: Rasmus Rørbæk)

2014.08.18 | Research

Don’t zinc - do!

Aarhus University’s PUMPkin Centre – a Centre of Excellence funded by the Danish National Research Foundation – has just succeeded in ‘taking’ the first photos of the mechanism that transports zinc out of the cells of organisms such as bacteria and plants. The study has just been published in Nature.

Gregers Rom Andersen (left) and Janus Asbjørn Schatz-Jakobsen

2014.08.18 | Awards

Nomination of the teacher and student teacher of the year at MBG

Gregers Rom Andersen was nominated the teacher of the year and Janus Asbjørn Schatz-Jakobsen the student teacher of the year at the Annual Meeting of the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics on Friday 15 August 2015.

More knowledge about how nitrogen compounds affect the plant can be useful in preventing fungal disease in barley. Photo: Janne Hansen

2014.08.13 | Grant

Nitrogen compounds control disease resistance in cereals

Nitrogen compounds play an important role in the plant’s fight against fungal diseases. Researchers are now seeking a better understanding of these mechanisms. This may present plant breeders with some new genetic tools for their work.

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Revised 2014.11.21

How to find the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

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Addresses

The Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (MBG)
is located at five different addresses:

  • The Science Park - Gustav Wieds Vej 10, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
  • Biokæden (Campus) - C.F. Møllers Allé 3, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
  • iNANO - Gustav Wieds Vej 14, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
  • Foulum - Blichers Allé 20, 8830 Tjele, Denmark
  • Flakkebjerg - Forsøgsvej 1, 4200 Slagelse, Denmark

More information on how to find these places and who works where


Contact information

at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

E-mail: mbg@au.dk
Tel.: +45 8715 0000
CVR-no.: 31119103
VAT ("moms") number: 31 11 91 03
EAN-no. 5798000419964
"Stedkode" (departmental id number): 2802


Internal information

For staff and students at
the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Aarhus University
Nordre Ringgade 1
DK-8000 Aarhus C

Email: au@au.dk
Tel: +45 8715 0000
Fax: +45 8715 0201

CVR no: 31119103

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