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Danish and Canadian researchers have uncovered important molecular details about the regulation of the cell biosynthesis-machinery during cellular stress. This knowledge has implications for anti-cancer treatment, since the implicated factors are key regulators of cell growth and proliferation.
Figure 2: LARP1 represses TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTOR. The left panel illustrates how TOP mRNA remains translated during normal growth conditions, where both LARP1 and eIF4E-BP1 (4E-BP1) are phosphorylated (P). This allows eIF4F (includes eIF4E, eIF4G and eIF4A) to interact with the cap-structure (m7Gppp) on the mRNA and effectively recruit the ribosome (40S/60S). The right panel shows stress conditions where LARP1 and eIF4E-BP1 are active (non-phosphorylated). These proteins will interact with eIF4E and the TOP sequence, respectively, which in turn occludes eIF4G association with the complex and translation becomes inefficient. The study also demonstrates that LARP1 stabilizes TOP mRNAs. Figure: Bruno Fonseca and Christian Damgaard

2015.05.22 | Research

New insights into fundamental stress-regulated cellular processes

Danish and Canadian researchers have uncovered important molecular details about the regulation of the cell biosynthesis-machinery during cellular stress. This knowledge has implications for anti-cancer treatment, since the implicated factors are key regulators of cell growth and proliferation.

The researchers intend to study whether there is evidence that certain genes can affect healthspan, and if so, which genes. Figure: Suresh Rattan.

2015.05.19 | Grant

The key to healthy ageing

In order to increase the quality of life, a group of researchers from the Laboratory of Cellular Ageing at Aarhus University, and their foreign collaborators intend to find the factors that influence health, ageing and longevity. The new project is supported by the EU with a grant amounting to Euro 7 million.

A newly developed method that combines phase extraction with an enzymatic reaction may eventually be used for an improved and faster screening analysis of isatin as a potential indicator of stress and neurological disorders. Figure: J. Preben Morth and Lisbeth Heilesen.

2015.05.11 | Research

Method for determining possible stress marker in blood samples

A research collaboration between the universities of Oslo and Aarhus has resulted in the development of a new method with diagnostic potential. The new method that combines phase extraction with an enzymatic reaction may eventually be used for an improved and faster screening analysis of isatin as a potential indicator of stress and neurological…

To the left, an illustration of the principle behind Spiegelmers. Normal aptamers are formed from D-nucleotides also used for RNA and DNA, whereas the Spiegelmers are constructed from L-nucleotides. The two molecules are therefore perfect mirror-images of each other. To the right is shown the three-dimensional structure of the Spiegelmer from the German company NOXXON Pharma AG bound to the inflammatory protein C5a determined by the scientists at Aarhus University through X-ray crystallography. Figure: Laure Yatime.

2015.05.05 | Research

Aarhus scientists look through the mirror to reveal the secrets of a new drug

Research results from Aarhus University can help develop anti-inflammatory drugs.

Improvement of cow feed efficiency through new genetic methods can protect the environment and boost the farmer's economy. Photo: Jesper Rais

2015.03.23 | Grant

Towards low-impact high-yielding cows

Burps, behaviour, blood and milk are some of the traits that can give us an indication of how efficient and eco-friendly a cow is. Scientists at Aarhus University are developing tools that can identify the most cost-effective cows. This will benefit the farmer’s economy and the environment.

Pigs in a pen affect each other. The group effect will therefore be included in breeding programmes with the aid of new breeding techniques. Photo: Jesper Rais

2015.03.11 | Grant

The effect of pig pen mates to be included in breeding programmes

Information about pigs' pen mates, advanced statistical models and genomic methods are some of the tools that researchers will use in a research project that aims to improve pig welfare and reduce their environmental impact.

As the first in the world, a group of researchers at Aarhus University has made a comprehensive description of the proteins in the venom. Photo: Simon Bomholt – gilamonsters.dk.

2015.02.24 | Research

Mapping lizard venom facilitates drug development

Lizards and other reptiles are not normally considered venomous, but a number of lizard species actually do produce and use venom. The most classic venomous lizard is no doubt the gila monster – a heavy-bodied lizard. As the first in the world, a group of researchers at Aarhus University has made a comprehensive description of the proteins in the…

The mouse to the left produces a high level of the protein stanniocalcin-2 and is therefore much smaller than the normal-sized mouse to the right (Photo: Malene Rune Jepsen).
Pictured at right is a transgenic mouse, which artificially produces a high level of stanniocalcin-2 and therefore demonstrates strongly reduced growth compared with the normal mouse at left – from the same litter. Growth factors called IGF signal cells that they should divide by binding to receptors on the surface of the cell. The signalling is precisely controlled by IGF inhibitors, which can prevent the IGF from binding with its receptor. However, the signalling can take place at the cellular surface, where the PAPP-A enzyme is present. PAPP-A cleaves the IGF inhibitor, thus actively releasing IGF, which triggers the signalling inside the cell. The presence of stanniocalcin-2 (right half of the figure) causes inactivation of PAPP-A – and thereby prevents indirect signalling, cell division and growth (Photo: Malene Rune Jepsen).

2015.02.20 | Research

Protein found to be the cause of small growth

The stanniocalcin-2 protein is very important for cellular growth, and a team of researchers has now discovered how it works. This could be significant for understanding growth in tissue such as cancer cells.

Hanne Poulsen has been awarded a Lundbeck Foundation Fellowship valued at DKK 10 million for a five-year research project (Photo: Lundbeckfonden)
It is necessary for all cells in the human body that the sodium-potassium pump works as it should. The pump is a complex and fascinating machine that works from its position in the cell membrane to ensure the right balance between sodium and potassium ions in the intracellular and extracellular environments (Figure: Hanne Poulsen)

2015.02.05 | Grant

Ion pumps in cells and their importance for nervous disorders

More knowledge about cellular ion pumps will pave the way for improved treatment of neurological disorders. Molecular Biologist Hanne Poulsen has just been awarded a Lundbeck Foundation Fellowship valued at DKK 10 million for a five-year research project.

Researchers from Aarhus University will develop dairy cattle breeds that are specially suited to organic production. Photo: Janne Hansen

2015.01.26 | Grant

Breeding for organic dairy production

A new project is set to benefit organic dairy production, partly by developing breeds of cows that are better suited to organic production and partly by creating niche dairy products based on knowledge of the cows' breeding characteristics.

2015.01.15 | Grant

Molecular Biology and Genetics researchers awarded considerable strategic funds

In the latest appropriation round, researchers at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics were awarded no fewer than three out of ten grants by the Programme Committee for Health, Food and Welfare under the Danish Council for Strategic Research (DSF).

Assistant Professor Stig Uggerhøj Andersen was awarded a grant of DKK 17 million from the Innovation Fund Denmark to increase the amount of nitrogen in organic farming. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen.
The researchers will study the correlation between clover yields and the genetic composition of the three components of the nitrogen cycle – soil bacteria, clover and grass. Photo: Colourbox.

2015.01.15 | Grant

Enough nitrogen for organic farming

One of the major challenges in organic farming is maintaining a positive balance in the nitrogen cycle. Nitrogen is an important nutrient for plants, but it is removed from the soil whenever crops are harvested. It can therefore be difficult to maintain a sufficiently high level of accessible nitrogen in the soil without using artificial…

Associate Professor Henrik Brinch-Pedersen has been awarded a grant of DKK 12.3 million by the Innovation Fund Denmark to develop natural food colouring. Photo: Charlotte Hamann Knudsen.
To meet the increasing demand for natural food colours, the research team intends to increase the content of the natural colorant anthocyanin in black carrots. Photo: Bjarne Jørnsgaard, Chr Hansen.

2015.01.15 | Grant

Developing natural food colouring

A number of synthetic food colours have been shown to have undesirable side effects, especially in children. Since 2010, the EU has demanded that selected synthetic dyes should be labelled, and there is a major world demand for natural food colours. Associate Professor Henrik Brinch-Pedersen has been awarded a grant of DKK 12.3 million by the…

Anders Olsen has been awarded DKK 10 million from the Innovation Fund Denmark to find out why some bacteria are healthy and some harmful. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen.
The researchers use the simple and popular nematode (roundworm) <em>C. elegans</em> in their studies. Because it is so small (1.2 mm) and has a short generation time (3 days), it is extremely well suited to this type of study. Photo: Anders Olsen.

2015.01.15 | Grant

Worms and health-promoting bacteria

A research collaboration between Aarhus University, SSI (State Serum Institute) and DuPont will find out why some bacteria are healthy and some harmful. A worm measuring 1.2 mm that feeds on bacteria will help provide the answers. The Innovation Fund Denmark has invested in the project by awarding a grant of DKK 10 million to Anders Olsen.

The co-occurrence of the NEXT complex and an accessible RNA 3’end drives an early RNA exosome decay. The NEXT complex, via its RNA-binding component RBM7, physically contacts RNAs early during their cellular lifecycle (1). NEXT binding does not automatically lead to decay by the exosome (2a), but the presence of NEXT provides the possibility for exosomal degradation, which can only occur upon emergence of an unprotected RNA 3’end (2b). One group of newly discovered NEXT substrates are metabolites of intronic snoRNA production events (3).

2015.01.08 | Research

How to target the RNA decay machinery

In collaboration with two other European groups, researchers from Aarhus University have uncovered molecular details leading to targetting of the major RNA decay machinery, the RNA exosome, to its nuclear RNA substrates. Studies can now be designed to address the role of this early nuclear RNA decay pathway in processes where rapid RNA decay may…

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Revised 2015.05.22

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The Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (MBG)
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  • The Science Park - Gustav Wieds Vej 10, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
  • Biokæden (Campus) - C.F. Møllers Allé 3, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
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E-mail: mbg@au.dk
Tel.: +45 8715 0000
CVR-no.: 31119103
VAT ("moms") number: 31 11 91 03
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"Stedkode" (departmental id number): 2802


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DK-8000 Aarhus C

Email: au@au.dk
Tel: +45 8715 0000
Fax: +45 8715 0201

CVR no: 31119103

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