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Bjarne Jochimsen (left) and Bjarne Hove-Jensen, along with a Canadian colleague, David Zechel, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, examined the existing knowledge around the degradation of phosphonates and assembled this in the review (Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen)
The first step in the degradation of glyphosate. Glyphosate exchanges with adenine of ATP in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme PhnI. Glyphosate is thus activated for further degradation, catalyzed by additional six enzymes. The remainder of the glyphosate is N- methylglycine. The overall degradation of glyphosate to phosphate and N-methylglycine requires 14 polypeptides encoded by the genes phnCDEFGHIJKLMNOP.

2014.03.21 | Public / media

Degradation of the herbicide RoundUp®

Reviewed information about the degradation of the active compound glyphosate in RoundUp® may eventually be useful in processes where the ability of the bacteria to break down organic compounds - such as phosphonates - used for removing substances that are hard for the environment to degrade.

Breeding of Jersey and Nordic Red Cattle in Denmark, Sweden and Finland can be given a major boost with the aid of a new genomics tool. Photo: Janne Hansen (Photo: Janne Hansen)

2014.03.06 | Grant

Nordic cattle breeds to be given a genetic boost

The relatively small population sizes of the dairy breeds Jersey and Nordic Red Cattle in the Nordic countries pose challenges in using genomic selection to increase genetic progress. A new scientific project aims at improving the methodology using in genomic prediction. Animal health, welfare and production will benefit.

Spider silk can be very useful for humans – all we need is to find out the trick. Photo: Colourbox
In collaboration with an international team of researchers, Daniel Otzen has published insight into how the proteins in a spider’s silk gland join together to form strong threads. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen

2014.02.25 | Public / media

Spider silk is acid

In collaboration with an international team of researchers, Professor Daniel Otzen, iNANO and MBG, has come closer to the ‘recipe’ for spider silk. The liquid protein material in the abdomen of the spider gradually becomes more and more acidic as it approaches the spinnerets.

The grain from the genetically modified barley is manually harvested using scissors. All other plant material apart from the ears is then collected in containers and sent for incineration. After the harvest, the field is sprayed with Roundup to kill all seedlings produced from spilt grain. Photo: Inger Holme

2014.02.27 | Public / media

Conventional breeding and genetic engineering go hand in hand

People, the environment and farm animals can benefit from cereals that have been bred to contain larger amounts of phytase – an enzyme that increases the availability of phosphate and other minerals. Conventional plant breeding methods cannot stand alone, but may be combined with the process of cisgenesis.

Daniel Otzen (left) and four other researchers with the EliteForsk Award presented by her Royal Highness Pricess Mary and Minister for Educationand Research Sofie Carsten Nielsen (Photo: the Danish Research Council)
Daniel Otzen and students looking at FTIR spectra of fibrils in the protein alpha-synuclein (Photo: Martin Kurnik)
Bacteria with fibrils (Photo: Gunna Kristiansen – the colours are applied)

2014.02.06 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Origami at the molecular level

Professor Daniel Otzen has been awarded an EliteForsk Award for his contribution to the understanding of protein behaviour and its significance for folding in particular.

Rasmus Pihl Rasmus Pihl has been awarded a Novo Nordisk Scholarship, giving him financial support during his thesis project.
In addition to the Novo Nordisk Scholarship, Rasmus Pihl was awarded a Queen Margrethe II's travel grant for studies abroad at Princeton University in Professor Muir's laboratory. <strong>Rasmus Pihl</strong>: back row, no. 6 from the left (Photo: C. Todd Reichart, Princeton University, Department of Chemistry). Click photo for enlargement.

2014.01.20 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Rasmus Pihl awarded Novo Nordisk Scholarship

Rasmus Pihl has been awarded a Novo Nordisk Scholarship, giving him financial support during his thesis project, which is carried out under the supervision of Professor Poul Nissen and Research Fellow Hanne Poulsen, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics. The purpose of the scholarship is to allow selected, talented students to devote full…

The three award winners with Minister Manu Sareen, from left: Signe Normand, Alicia Lundby and Anne-Marie Lund Winther (Foto: L’Oréal)
Anne-Marie Lund Winther (Foto: Stine Heilman, L’Oréal)

2014.01.16 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Award for research into the importance of the calcium pump for the heart

Industrial Postdoctoral Fellow Anne-Marie Lund Winther, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, has been awarded a L’Oréal–UNESCO For Women in Science Fellowship for her research into the importance of calcium balance for muscle contraction – with particular focus on the heart.

Cecilie Skeby has received a Novo Scholarship to complete her Master studies.

2014.01.09 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Novo Scholarship til Master student

Cecilie Skeby, Masters student in Prof. Jørgen Kjems' group has received a Novo Scholarship. Read about her project below

High milk yield in dairy cows is negatively correlated to fertility. Scientists have now found a gene sequence that affects this relationship. Photo: Colourbox

2014.01.03 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Important mutation discovered in dairy cattle

Scientists have discovered a mutation with a built-in dilemma for dairy cattle breeders. The deleted gene sequence has a positive effect on milk yield but causes embryonic death in dairy cattle.

For the past five years new genetic technology has created a revolution in Danish agriculture. Productivity has increased, cows have become healthier, and the technology can be spread to help produce more climate-friendly food for the world’s increasing population (Photo: Linda Søndergaard Sørensen)
Bernt Guldbrandtsen

2014.01.02 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

DNA technology can help ensure food security

For the past five years new genetic technology has created a revolution in Danish agriculture. Productivity has increased, cows have become healthier, and the technology can be spread to help produce more climate-friendly food for the world’s increasing population.

Senior Scientist Mogens Duch has been awarded a grant of DKK 5 million to develop a new platform technology for producing vaccines against a wide range of human viral pathogens (Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen)

2013.12.19 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Researchers aim to develop a new and effective vaccine against SARS

The Danish Council for Independent Research | Technology and Production Sciences (FTP) has awarded a grant of DKK 5 million to Senior Scientist Mogens Duch to develop vaccines against a wide range of human viral diseases such as SARS.

The Danish Council for Strategic Research has awarded Associate Professor Simona Radutoiu a grant of DKK 15.2 million to combat fungi in barley. Postdoctoral Fellow Svend Secher Dam (right) is a colleague and working partner on the project (Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen)
Early stage of an attack of ramularia leaf spot on a barley plant (Photo: Neil Havis)
Later stage of an attack of ramularia leaf spot on a barley plant (Photo: Neil Havis)

2013.12.16 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Developing tools to combat fungi in barley

Fungal contamination of barley crops can cause reduced yields due to the disease leaf spot. A team of Danish and Scottish researchers will now develop tools to breed resistant varieties of barley and provide an early diagnosis of outbreaks so the disease can be reduced or eliminated. The Danish Council for Strategic Research has just granted…

Finn Skou Pedersen (second from left) has been awarded a grant of DKK 15 million from the Danish Council for Strategic Research to find a new vaccine to combat the swine disease PRRS. Here he is flanked by the other participants in the project from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University (from left: Stig Uggerhøj Andersen, FSP, Mogens Duch and Jens Stougaard) (Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen)
PRRS (Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome) is the most serious of all the contagious swine diseases in the world. Since the disease was found in Denmark in 1992, it has had a major impact on animal welfare, just as it has cost farmers a considerable amount (Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen)

2013.12.16 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Fighting the most important contagious swine disease in the world

An international team of researchers is determined to develop a new and more effective vaccine against PRRS – the most important contagious swine disease in the world – which annually costs society enormous amounts and leads to poor animal welfare. The Danish Council for Strategic Research has just granted Professor Finn Skou Pedersen DKK 15…

In collaboration with research groups in Japan and the USA, Danish scientists have shown that the milk protein osteopontin can slow down the development of liver injury caused by alcohol abuse. From left: Esben Skipper Sørensen and Brian Christensen, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University (Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen)
The researchers' experiments show that osteopontin from milk can bind to certain inflammatory substances that are present in the liver injured by alcohol. In this way, osteopontin could possibly inhibit the inflammation and prevent liver injury (Photo: Colourbox)

2013.12.12 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Avoid liver injury and drink milk with your Christmas schnapps

Collaboration between Danish, Japanese and American researchers has shown that the milk protein osteopontin can slow down the development of liver injury caused by alcohol abuse.

Copper is a heavy metal that is essential for a number of the body’s vital functions, but harmful in excessive amounts. Human health therefore depends on the body’s ability to regulate the level of copper in the cells. This regulation takes place by means of the copper pump, which researchers have now come one step closer to understanding (Photo: Wikipedia)
It may not look like much, and it is no more than a couple of nanometres in size, but it is nevertheless this copper pump that safeguards the body’s cells against copper poisoning. When the individual parts of the copper pump (indicated in different colours) turn in relation to each other, the passage of copper ions is opened and shut in the cell membrane, marked between the grey and turquoise parts in the membrane. The turquoise and grey elements are the copper pump’s membrane-bound part with markings of individual segments of the amino acid sequence (MA, MB, M1–M6) and a couple of specific amino acids (E189 and M717), which are crucial for the excretion of copper. The yellow spheres mark the copper’s route through the protein and out of the cell, as analysed by computer simulations by the Californian working partners in the research project. (Illustrations: Daniel Mattle and Magnus Andersson)
In addition to Postdoctoral Fellow Pontus Gourdon (left) and PhD Student Oleg Sitsel (right), Professor Poul Nissen, PhD Student Daniel Mattle, and Laboratory Technicians Tetyana Klymchuk and Anna Marie Nielsen, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, are co-authors of the scientific article. Also participating were researchers at the Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, and the University of California, Irvine (Photos: Lisbeth Heilesen)

2013.12.09 | Public / media, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

How the cells remove copper

New research from Aarhus University provides deeper insight into causes of serious diseases involving copper metabolism. Mapping the mechanism that regulates the transport of copper across the cell membrane and out of the body’s cells actually provides a new understanding of conditions related to chronic imbalance in the body’s level of copper.

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Revised 2014.04.11

How to find the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

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Addresses

The Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (MBG)
is located at five different addresses:

  • The Science Park - Gustav Wieds Vej 10, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
  • Biokæden (Campus) - C.F. Møllers Allé 3, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
  • iNANO - Gustav Wieds Vej 14, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
  • Foulum - Blichers Allé 20, 8830 Tjele, Denmark
  • Flakkebjerg - Forsøgsvej 1, 4200 Slagelse, Denmark

More information on how to find these places and who works where


Contact information

at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

E-mail: mbg@au.dk
Tel.: +45 8715 0000
CVR-no.: 31119103
VAT ("moms") number: 31 11 91 03
EAN-no. 5798000419964
"Stedkode" (departmental id number): 2802


Internal information

For staff and students at
the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Aarhus University
Nordre Ringgade 1
DK-8000 Aarhus C

Email: au@au.dk
Tel: +45 8715 0000
Fax: +45 8715 0201

CVR no: 31119103

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