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Figure. A functional competition between RNA export factor AlyREF and the RNA exosome adaptor protein ZFC3H1 determines the fate of polyadenylated RNA. Shortly after RNA transcription starts, the nascent RNA is bound by the cap-binding proteins, CBP20 and CBP80. ARS2 directly interacts with CBP20/CBP80 to bridge interactions with several different complexes that determine RNA fate. (Left panel of the figure). Polyadenylated RNAs, like most mRNAs, are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in a process involving the export factor AlyREF, which interacts with CBP20/CBP80 to recruit the export machinery. (Right panel of the figure). ZFC3H1 acts as a central factor in retention and degradation of polyadenylated RNA. This prevents unwanted RNAs from entering the cytoplasm where they could potentially cause a global translation collapse. Figure: Toomas Silla.

2018.05.16 | Research

New nuclear RNA retention activity discovered

Gene expression involves mRNA transport from its place of synthesis to the cytoplasm where protein translation occurs. However, many non-coding RNA species do not follow this flow and new data now demonstrate how cells prevent the unwanted export of RNA and instead ensure nuclear degradation.

The long non-coding RNA called A-ROD functions as a lasso to recruit proteins to the DKK1 gene. Figure Figure: Evgenia Ntini

2018.04.24 | Research

A non-coding RNA lasso catches proteins in breast cancer cells

A Danish-German research team has shown that not only the where and when of long non-coding RNA expression is important for their function but also the how. The results can have a big impact on our understanding of dynamic regulation of gene expression in biological processes.

Ditlev E. Brodersen receives DKK 10 mio. from the Novo Nordisk Foundation to study how microorganisms defend themselves. The research will be of great importance for the treatment of infectious diseases in the future. Photo: Lars Kruse, AU-foto.

2018.04.04 | Grant

Ditlev E. Brodersen is among the first to be appointed Novo Nordisk Foundation Hallas-Møller Ascending Investigator

As one of the first researchers in the country, Associate Professor Ditlev E. Brodersen receives the Hallas-Møller Ascending Investigator grant as part of the Novo Nordisk Foundation Research Leader Programme. The 10 mio DKK (ca. Euro 1,342,320) grant will provide Ditlev Brodersen's research lab with opportunities to explore the survival…

Postdoc Peter Refsing Andersen has been awarded a Hallas-Møller Emerging Investigator grant of DKK 10 mio. over the next five years to establish a research group at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, AU, to study genetic parasites. Photo: Ernst Tobisch.

2018.04.04 | Grant

Peter Refsing Andersen awarded the Hallas-Møller Emerging Investigator grant

Postdoc Peter Refsing Andersen from the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology (IMBA) at Vienna BioCenter in Austria has been awarded a Hallas-Møller Emerging Investigator grant of DKK 10 mio. (ca. Euro 1,342,320) over the next five years to establish a research group at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, AU, to study genetic…

From the opening ceremony: (from left) Jens Peter Holst Lauritsen from the Novo Nordisk Foundation, Jørgen Kjems from MBG and iNANO, Kurt V. Gothelf from Chemistry and iNANO and Ken Howard from MBG and iNANO, and iNANO Center Manager, Trolle Linderoth. Photo: Roar Paaske.

2018.03.21 | Grant

Starting signal for the multifunctional medicine of the future

The potential for the research now being addressed by the Center for Multifunctional Biomolecular Drug Design (CEMBID) at Aarhus University is enormous. The goal is to create a new generation of drugs that can be used to diagnose and treat cancer and atherosclerosis - which together represent two thirds among the causes of death globally.

Left panel of the figure displays the structure of the newly developed nanobody (magenta) bound to a C3 fragment called C3b (green). In the right panels, data demonstrating that the nanobody and mutants hereof are able to inhibit the cleavage of C3 in 15% human serum. The researchers also constructed a nanobody mutant that completely loses it inhibitory effect on C3 cleavage (purple curve) making it a perfect negative control. Figure: Rasmus Kjeldsen Jensen and Janus Asbjørn Schatz-Jakobsen.

2018.03.15 | Research

A small protein with many applications

Researchers from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and from the Department of Biomedicine at Aarhus University have collaboratively developed and described a llama-antibody that might have significant impact for future diagnostics and treatment of, e.g., kidney diseases.

Fungal diseases cause major loss in both field and storage, so it is important to find effective tools to fight them. Photo: Aarhus University

2018.03.12 | Research

Cereals have a built-in defence against fungal attacks

Researchers at Aarhus University have identified a gene in wheat and barley that can protect the cereal from attack by the fungi Fusarium and Aspergillus.

A volcanic "hot pool" with archaea in various orange colours growing along the edge. The three-dimensional structure of the anti-CRISPR protein is shown in the foreground. Image is courtesy of Ditlev E. Brodersen, AU/Colourbox.

2018.03.06 | Research

Arms race among microbes

The hot, muddy pools of Iceland are home to a number of simple, single-celled organisms, and new research shows that they also constitute a true biological battlefield and the basis for an arms race of unprecedented magnitude. The new knowledge about the struggle between living organisms in hot pools gives us a much better understanding of how…

Photo: Pixabay.com

2018.03.02 | Grant

New research project aims to boost the production of young sows for organic breeding

The PorganiX project will create the first, organic, core livestock of young sows, genetically selected for organic breeding goals, to produce more robust, organic pigs. The outcome of the pioneer project will be an overall lift of the organic, pig producing sector, in Denmark and internationally.

Polarised human melanoma cells in suspension. The picture to the left shows a fluorescence microscopic image showing polar distribution of the protein ezrin (displayed in yellow), and the actin cytoskeleton (displayed in magenta). The cell nucleus is shown in cyan. The picture to the right shows a thin section transmission electron microscopy image revealing strong polar folding of the plasma membrane, which makes the pole "sticky" and enhances cell attachment. Figure: Anna Lorentzen.

2018.02.28 | Research

How polarisation helps tumour cells metastasise

An international research team identifies single-cell polarity as a feature of circulating tumour cells that helps cells to leave circulation and found metastases. The novel results provide a new potential target in the fight against metastatic cancer.

Researchers from Aarhus University have identified DNA variants that affect udder health in cows. Photo: Colourbox

2018.02.28 | Research

Data from milking can be used to promote cow health

Technology on the dairy farm can be used to improve the genetic evaluation of dairy cow milking traits and thus improve the animals’ health and welfare.

Kjeld A. Marcker. Photo: Anne Marcker

2018.02.26 | People

Professor Kjeld Marcker - one of the major pioneers of molecular biology – died

Together with Nobel Laureate Fred Sanger, Kjeld Marcker revealed that protein synthesis initiation was dependent on a completely different mechanism than expected, as all proteins were synthesised using a very special methionine initiator tRNA. Also, Kjeld Marcker's research group was the first to clone and determine the DNA sequence of the gene…

An international research team might have found a drug that can be used as treatment against Alzheimer’s disease. Figure: Yujun Hou, NIA, NIH.

2018.02.06 | Research

Nicotinamide Riboside – a new promising treatment against Alzheimer’s Disease

By treating different mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease with a precursor of NAD+, which is a central coenzyme in the metabolism of the cell, an international research team might have found a drug that can be used as treatment against Alzheimer’s disease. Treatment of Alzheimer’s disease mice improved their neuronal function, memory and learning…

Jørgen Kjems. Photo: Novo Nordisk Foundation.

2018.01.31 | Awards

Jørgen Kjems awarded the Novo Nordisk Prize 2018

Jørgen Kjems, professor at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and iNANO, receives the Novo Nordisk Prize 2018 for his interdisciplinary pioneering studies of how the DNA's biological cousin, RNA, plays a key role in cell regulation and has a huge potential in future disease treatment.

The three recipients of the Innovation Fund Denmark's Grand Solution Prize. Left: Senior Researcher Peter Løvendahl, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Project Manager Jan Lassen, Viking Genetics and Chief Scientific Officer Henrik Bjørn Nielsen, The Technical University of Denmark. Photo: Maiken Kestner.

2018.01.29 | Awards

The Innovation Fund Denmark's Grand Solution Prize is awarded to three researchers for their breeding of climate-friendly cows

Peter Løvendahl from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University, Jan Lassen from Viking Genetics and Henrik Bjørn Nielsen from the Technical University of Denmark receive the Innovation Fund Denmark's Grand Solution Prize for the breeding of climate-friendly cows, which alone in Denmark ensures a reduced emission…

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