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The Director Ib Henriksen Foundation’s Researcher Award 2016 goes to Professor Poul Nissen Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Foto.

2016.11.23 | Awards

The Director Ib Henriksen Foundation’s Researcher Award 2016 goes to Professor Poul Nissen

Professor Poul Nissen has won the prestigious Director Ib Henriksen Foundation’s Researcher Award 2016 for his outstanding efforts in structural biology. The foundation justifies the choice of Professor Nissen with his ability to promote interdisciplinary and international cooperation in his field of research.

Images depicting <em>Lotus japonicus</em> wild-type (a) and nodule symbiosis-deficient mutant plants: lhk1-1 (b), nfr5-3 (c), nin-2(d) following harvest. For nodulating genotypes (a and b), insets present close-up view of nodules. Scale bars correspond to 1 cm. Photos: Rafal Zgadzaj, Section for Plant Molecular Biology, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, AU.

2016.11.21 | Research

Nitrogen fixing symbiosis is crucial for legume plant microbiome assembly

New findings from the study of legumes have identified an unknown role of nitrogen fixation symbiosis on plant root-associated microbiome, which agriculture may benefit from in the future.

Corneal dystrophy is an eye disease causing protein deposits in the cornea leading to decreased or complete lack of vision. The existing treatment options are not sustainable, and therefore it would be ideal if there were other non-surgically ways to treat the disease, and this is exactly what a team of researchers from Aarhus University and Aalborg University Hospital have joined forces to find. Photo: Eung Kweon Kim, Department of Ophthalmology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.

2016.11.16 | Grant

Researchers intend to find a better treatment for corneal dystrophy

Corneal dystrophy is an eye disease causing protein deposits in the cornea leading to decreased or complete lack of vision. The existing treatment options are not sustainable, and therefore Danish researchers intend to find a better and long lasting treatment for the disease.

Models of NEXT- and PAXT-dependent nuclear RNA decay assemblies. Schematic comparison of protein-protein links within the NEXT complex (left) and the PAXT connection (right). While both NEXT and PAXT pathways appear capable of detecting capped RNA by virtue of their physical linkages to the CBC, the different RNA binding proteins (RBM7 for NEXT and PABPN1 for PAXT) discriminate their specificities. Question mark indicates that the ZFC3H1-PABPN1 linkage might not be direct.

2016.11.07 | Research

Newly discovered RNA decay pathway inside human nuclei

Genomes are promiscuously transcribed into RNA. However, not all of this material is immediately useful, which means it has to be targeted and degraded in order to sustain cellular life. A newly discovered RNA decay pathway functioning inside human nuclei does just that.

Danish researchers will target their breeding programmes with rainbow trout to include adaptations to different production environments worldwide by the use of genomic selection. Photo: Kristian Meier.

2016.10.28 | Grant

Rainbow trout breeding will be targeted different production environments in the world

With the use of genomic selection, Danish researchers will target their breeding of rainbow trout towards adaptations to different production environments worldwide. This could pave the way for an even larger export of eggs from rainbow trout.

Researchers from Aarhus University in front of the advanced electron microscope in Aarhus. From left: Thomas Boesen, Gregers Rom Andersen and Poul Nissen, all from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen

2016.10.19 | Grant

New initiative will promote brain research in Denmark

Five of Denmark’s leading researchers on structural biology will collaborate on a project to gain insight into the brain’s functions and diseases. The initiative is called BRAINSTRUC and funded by Lundbeckfonden with up to DKK 60 million over a five-year period.

A research team intends to optimise grass species that will help to get cows to burp less – and thus reduce greenhouse gases – as well as increase the cows' milk production. Photo: Colourbox

2016.10.06 | Grant

Super grass to increase cow milk production and reduce methane emissions

A research team is working on optimising grass species that will reduce cow burps, thus reducing greenhouse gas emissions – in addition to increasing cow milk production.

Gareth Difford
Gareth Difford won "the young scientist award" for his talk "Genes and microbes, the next step in dairy cattle breeding"

2016.09.22 | Awards

Gareth Difford wins Young Scientist Award

PhD student Gareth Difford won "the young scientist award" for best talk in the Genetics Commission at this year EAAP conference in Belfast.

Campanula is used in a research project for the development of potted plants, with selected genes using precision processing techniques.

2016.09.13 | Grant

Sustainability lies in the genes

Potted plants can be produced much more sustainably by using new precision breeding - instead of chemicals and GMO. The technique can also be applied to other crops.

Sofie Hindkjær Lautrup. Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Foto

2016.09.08 | Grant

Sofie Hindkjær Lautrup receives Her Majesty Queen Margrethe II’s Travel Grant

During Aarhus University's Annual Celebration on Friday 9 September 2016, Sofie H. Lautrup from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics receives a travel grant to study in the USA.

Professor Sierd Cloetingh, the president of Academia Europaea, presented Simonoa Radutoiu with the prize. Photo: Tamás Thaler, Budapest.
The Adam Kondorosi Academia Europaea Award for Early-Career Investigators. Photo: Tamás Thaler, Budapest.

2016.08.31 | Awards

Simona Radutoiu receives "The Adam Kondorosi Academia Europaea Award"

As the first-ever recipient, Simona Radutoiu received "The Adam Kondorosi Academia Europaea Award for Early Career Investigators" during a conference in Budapest, Hungary.

A variant of the FUT1 gene has been shown to be able to protect pigs' intestines against E. coli. This knowledge may be used proactively in the efforts to cut back on antibiotics. Photo: Janne Hansen.

2016.08.18 | Research

Gene variant in pigs may open up for less use of antibiotics

A variant of the FUT1 gene has been shown to be able to protect pigs' intestines against E. coli. This knowledge may be used proactively in the efforts to cut back on antibiotics.

1) Gene promoters that are far away from other genes typically produce transcripts on both strands. The PROMoter uPstream Transcript (PROMPT) is short and rapidly degraded due to special DNA sequence patterns around the PROMPT and which are not present at the gene start site. Thus, the gene product is typically a stable mRNA.   2) If two gene start sites share a common promoter, no PROMPTs are produced. Both genes start sites produce stable RNAs.  3) If two gene promoters are closely positioned, PROMPTs are produced, but are stabilized because the DNA signals necessary for their degradation cannot form because the gene promoters are too close. Instead, the PROMPTs grow longer and are stable, which in effect creates longer mRNA variants from the two gene start sites.  4) If gene promoters are sufficiently separated, their DNA patterns do not influence their neighboring PROMPTs, which remain short and unstable, much like in the first case above.

2016.08.15 | Research

Generation of complex gene architectures in the human genome

Intense investigations during the past 10-15 years have revealed that the human genome is transcribed in a manner that is much more complicated than previously appreciated. A collaboration between researchers from Aarhus and Copenhagen now reveals some underlying principles leading to such promiscuous genome activity.

A research team based in Denmark has obtained results that may be a step towards the fight against protease-related diseases such as influenza, skin diseases and cancer by taking advantage of a naturally occurring protease inhibitor. Figure: Jan K. Jensen

2016.07.14 | Research

Study of a naturally occurring inhibitor of essential enzymes with latent disease-causing properties

A research team based in Denmark has obtained results that may be a step towards the fight against protease-related diseases such as influenza, skin diseases and cancer by taking advantage of a naturally occurring protease inhibitor.

2016.06.22 | Grant

Large grants to researchers from MBG

The Danish Council for Independent Research ("Det Frie Forskningsråd") ("DFF") has given six grants amounting to DKK 18 million to researchers at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics.

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