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During DNA replication, single-stranded breaks in the genome will be converted to double strand breaks. Such breaks are normally repaired by a very imprecise mechanism, which may incorporate mistakes in the genome (here shown as red stretches of DNA). To avoid too many mutations, a nuclease called Mus81 acts at these positions to decrease the distance, where the imprecise mechanism is used (Photo: Colourbox; drawing: Lotte Bjergbæk)

2015.08.24 | Research

Identifying mechanism that repairs damage to our genome

One of the most common forms of damage to our genome is a break in one of our DNA strands. Researchers have now found a mechanism that can repair these breaks naturally and thereby help to suppress the development of cancer.

Figure A. Methyl phosphate. B. Methyl phosphonate. Phosphonate compounds are characterised by a direct link between carbon (C) and phosphorus (P), marked with red. C. The molecular structure of the C-P lyase complex (Figure: Ditlev E. Brodersen, Aarhus University)
The Danish research team behind the article in <em>Nature</em>; from left: Bjarne Jochimsen, Lan Bich Van, Morten Kjeldgaard, Paulina Seweryn, Bjarne Hove-Jensen and Ditlev E. Brodersen (Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen, Aarhus University)
The British research team: Lori A. Passmore and Christopher J. Russo (Photo: Martin Phelps, Medical Research Council, Cambridge)

2015.08.17 | Research

Bacteria’s secret weapon against pesticides and antibiotics revealed

Bacteria exhibit extreme adaptability, which makes them capable of surviving in the most inhospitable conditions. New research results produced by Danish and British researchers now reveal the molecular details behind one of the secret weapons used by bacteria in their battle to survive under very nutrient-poor and even toxic conditions.