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For several years, researchers at Aarhus University have studied the molecular mechanisms that enable bacteria to hide in this way, and new research now suggests that they also make use of code language in their attempt to avoid being controlled. Figure: Ditlev E. Brodersen.
Kirstine Louise Bendtsen, MSc, and PhD student Kehan Xu have carried out the published work.

2016.12.21 | Research

Researchers reveal the secret code language of bacteria

Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a growing global challenge. Danish researchers have now discovered that bacteria use a code language to avoid being controlled. Understanding this code language will be paramount to developing new antibiotics in the future.

2016.12.16 | People

Christmas at MBG Foulum

At the Center for Quantitative Genetics and Genomics, MBG-Foulum, employees have decorated the office hallway with flags. Each flag tells the nationality of the people at the offices on the right and left side of the hallway.

Suresh Rattan

2016.12.16 | Awards

Suresh Rattan receives the “Outstanding Career Achievement Award”

The International Dose Response Society in USA has announced their 2017 “Outstanding Career Achievement Award” to Suresh Rattan for his long-standing work on the application of hormesis in ageing research and interventions.

Poul Nissen (left) and Jens Stougaard har ved en ceremoni fået overrakt Ridder af Dannebrogordenen.

2016.12.14 | People

Poul Nissen and Jens Stougaard awarded the Order of Dannebrog

At an audience at the royal castle Amalienborg in Copenhagen on Monday 12 December 2016, Professor Poul Nissen and Professor Jens Stougaard thanked her Majesty the Queen of Denmark for the order of Dannebrog.

Figure: Crystal structure of the RBM7–ZCCHC8 core complex shown in two orientations. RBM7-RRM (in green) folds into the typical globular domain with four antiparallel <em>&beta;</em>-strands (<em>&beta;</em>1–<em>&beta;</em>4) at the front and two <em>&alpha;</em>-helices at the back (<em>&alpha;</em>1 and <em>&alpha;</em>2). ZCCHC8 Pro (proline rich region, in pink) positions the N terminus at the top of the RRM and then stretches downward, laying over helix <em>&alpha;</em>1 and reaching the bottom of the domain where it makes a <em>&sim;</em>90° bend and continues laterally with an <em>&alpha;</em>-helix (helix <em>&alpha;</em>A), then twists into a <em>&sim;</em>90° coil and continues upward with a second <em>&alpha;</em>-helix (helix <em>&alpha;</em>B), reaching the top of RBM7-RRM. Finally, ZCCHC8-Pro makes another <em>&sim;</em>90° bend and extends laterally over helix <em>&alpha;</em>2, ending with a short helical turn. The C- and N-terminal residues of ZCCHC8-Pro interact with each others at the top of RBM7-RRM.

2016.12.07 | Research

Discovery of connection between RNA splicing and decay machineries

RNA synthesis, splicing and degradation are key activities in eukaryotic gene expression regulation. A collaborative effort between researchers from the Max Planck Institute, Martinsried and Aarhus University now reveals the physical basis for linking RNA degradation to the splicing process.