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Poul Nissen receives the diploma and medal from Christina Moberg, President of The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Photo: Alexander Mahmoud/ The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
Professors Poul Nissen (left) and Chikashi Toyoshima, University of Tokyo, Japan, shared the Aminoff Prize 2016. Photo: Alexander Mahmoud/ The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences

2016.04.05 | Awards

Poul Nissen awarded the Aminoff Prize 2016

On Thursday 30 March 2016, Poul Nissen was awarded the Aminoff Prize 2016 by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences – the first Dane ever – for his fundamental contributions to the understanding of the structural basis for ATP-driven transport of ions across cell membranes.

A certain gene variant has a major influence on the composition of the gut flora in the pig. This can impact the need for using antibiotics. Photo: Janne Hansen

2016.03.16 | Research

Can we use genetic variations to reduce the use of antibiotics?

Selection for pigs with genes for healthy intestinal flora may be able to reduce agriculture’s use of antibiotics and thus reduce the problems of antibiotic resistance. New knowledge paves the way for this opportunity.

Danish researchers have discovered that mitochondria from mistletoe contain only 10 genes. This discovery will ultimately lead to a better understanding of how mitochondria function and not least how the interaction between parasite and host functions. Photo: Colourbox.
Mistletoe (Viscum album) is a shrub that grows on other plants as a parasite (Photo: Colourbox). Photo: Colourbox.

2016.03.17 | Research

Remember the mistletoe!

Danish researchers have discovered that mitochondria from mistletoe contain only 10 genes. This discovery will ultimately lead to a better understanding of how mitochondria function and not least how the interaction between parasite and host functions. This discovery could be very important if we can use the knowledge to fight the massive loss of…

Ebbe Sloth Andersen, age 39, assistant professor at iNANO and the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, has been researching nanostructures since 2007, and his ERC grant will support the further development of the RNA origami technique. Photo: Lars Kruse.
The RNA double helix is one of the building blocks of RNA origami, a method for creating nanostructures in complex, predefined forms. The blueprints for RNA origamis are shown in white in the background. Illustration: Cody Geary.
The image shows one of the stages in an RNA origami, where the enzyme RNA-polymerase triggers the folding of the nanostructure encoded in the DNA. When the nanostructures have formed, they organise themselves into a hexagonal crystal. Illustration: Cody Geary.
The paper figures are created by Ebbe Sloth Andersen to visualise the difference between the RNA origami and DNA origami methods. Whereas RNA origami is folded of a single strand of RNA, just as an origami crane is folded out of a single piece of paper, DNA origami is folded out of a strand of DNA and hundreds of staple strands, as if staples were used to fold a paper crane. Photo: Ebbe Sloth Andersen.

2016.03.02 | Grant

EUR 2 million grant to RNA origami research

Assistant professor Ebbe Sloth Andersen from MBG and iNANO has received EUR 2 million from the European Research Council (ERC). This grant will help him bring biological nanostructure research into a new phase in the field of synthetic biology – a field which may ultimately have enormous significance for the medicine, energy, food and agriculture…

Professor Torben Heick Jensen has now received a prestigious grant from the Lundbeck Foundation amounting to DKK 10 million over five years to reveal new functional entities and regulatory principles within mammalian genomes. (Foto: Colourbox). 
Using HeLa cells as a model system, the Heick Jensen and Sandelin groups have previously devised an approach to profile the susceptibility of any RNA to rapid decay. Transcribed HeLa promoters were grouped into five major classes via k-medoids clustering based upon the sensitivity of their emitted RNAs to the ribonucleolytic exosome, their expression levels and their transcriptional strand bias (directionality) and visualized by principal component analysis (PCA). For a further read see: Andersson et al. Nature Communications 2014.

2016.02.25 | Grant

Finding hidden treasures in our DNA

The human genome is promiscuously transcribed yielding RNA from >75% of its DNA, and throughout the years, researchers world-wide have tried to find out how much of this material is functional. Danish researchers have now received a prestigious grant from the Lundbeck Foundation to address this problem.

Research will make it possible to replace animal protein with potato protein extracted from the production of potato starch. Thus, the potatoes will be exploited better and contribute to a more sustainable feeding of the world's growing population (Photo: the Innovation Fund Denmark)

2016.02.22 | Grant

Potatoes as a sustainable alternative to animal protein

Research will make it possible to replace animal protein with potato protein extracted from the production of potato starch. Thus, the potatoes will be exploited better and contribute to a more sustainable feeding of the world's growing population.

Danish researchers have found that a unit in the sodium-potassium pump, which is mainly located in the cerebellum, has special properties (figure: Wojciech Kopec)

2016.02.09 | Research

New insight into a cerebellar sodium-potassium pump

Danish researchers have found that a unit in the sodium-potassium pump, which is mainly located in the cerebellum, has special properties.

Researchers will optimise the cultivation of beans to replace imported soya bean protein with locally produced faba bean protein for animal feed and food ingredients. (Photo: Jens Knudsen, Nordic Seed).
The Danish plant breeding companies Nordic Seed og Sejet Planteforædling also participate in the project to optimise the cultivation of faba beans (Photo: Jens Knudsen, Nordic Seed).

2016.02.05 | Grant, Knowledge exchange

New types of faba bean for Danish production of protein

Faba beans have great potential as a protein crop, and researchers will now optimise the cultivation of beans to replace imported soya bean protein with locally produced faba bean protein for animal feed and food ingredients.

Magnus Kjærgaard was awarded DKK 5 million from VILLUM FONDEN'S Young Investigator Programme. Photo: Lars Kruse, AU Foto

2016.01.25 | Grant

Magnus Kjærgaard awarded prestigious grant

Magnus Kjærgaard was awarded a grant of DKK 5 million by VILLUM FONDEN's Young Investigator Programme 2016, supporting young, talented researchers. The grant will allow Magnus to investigate how the physical association of biomolecules affects signalling pathways.

“It’s truly fantastic to get to formulate your own ideas and get to make a setup made that lets you bring them to life. That’s what drives research, and that’s what keeps it interesting to work with. Not the next result, because that’s unpredictable,” states Jens Stougaard (Photo: VILLUM FONDEN)

2016.01.22 | People

Crises produce new initiatives – and hopefully a really good new idea

Thirty years ago, he left Denmark to do research with the best scientists in his field. Today, research talents from all over the world come to Aarhus to kickstart their careers by working with him.

Professor Jens Stougaard is the recipient of the 2016 Villum Kan Rassmussen Annual Award of DKK 5 million. The foundation has chosen to honour Stougaard with the award in recognition of his extraordinary work on plant biology (Photo: Villum Foundation).

2016.01.21 | Awards

Villum Kann Rasmussen Annual Award goes to molecular biologist

Professor Jens Stougaard receives Denmark's largest individual research award, the 2016 Villum Kann Rasmussen Annual Award for Technical and Scientific Research, valued at DKK 5 million. Candidates do not apply for this award from the VILLUM FOUNDATION.

Model of the protein PfATP6 based on the structure of the calcium pump from rabbit muscle. The extensive areas of gray is without a well-defined structure (Figure by J. Preben Morth, from Arnou B et al. Biochem Soc Trans. 2011 Jun;39(3):823-31).

2016.01.15 | Research

Scientists refute previous studies of malaria drug

Danish and French researchers refute previous studies in malaria research. The new results are a step in the right direction to improve and develop malaria medicine.

2016.01.13 | Research

The invisible sign of the genome

Traditionally it has been thought that only a few percent of our genome plays a role. Research has previously focused on the coding DNA, but also areas outside the focus area may have an impact. Scientists are starting to sort out the huge pile of genetic material called non-coding RNA.

Poul Nissen (left) and Thomas Boesen in front of the Titan Krios microscope located at Aarhus University (Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen)

2016.01.11 | Grant

Electron Microscopy on the national roadmap

The Danish Agency for Research and Innovation has announced their roadmap for research infrastructures, which includes several initiatives on e.g. imaging, genetics, proteomics, and compound library screening, which will also critically support DANDRITE research activities and initiatives.

Human milk contains nanostructures that apparently carry messages from the mother's cells to the baby's cells. Photo: Colourbox

2016.01.05 | Research

Milk as a messenger

Human milk contains tiny structures that can carry messages from the mother’s cells to her infant’s cells. Scientists at Aarhus University have studied the structure and function of these nano-packages more closely.

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