A new model for activation of the immune system


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The figure shows the structure of C1 investigated by two different techniques. To the left is shown data recorded by the scientists with X- (black curve) at the PETRA III synchrotron in Hamborg. The grey curve shows how a curve calculated from the model in the middle panel fits to the eksperimental data. To the right  is shown so-called class averages of images recorded with electron microskopy. In row two to the right is clearly seen 10 protrusions, which is strictly nono-compatible with the the old model for activation of complement. For this reason the EM-data was pivotal for the results.

2017.01.20 | Research

A new model for activation of the immune system

By studying a large protein (the C1 protein) with X-rays and electron microscopy, researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark have established a new model for how an important part of the innate immune system is activated. The activation of the C1 protein is a fundamental mechanism in immunology, and therefore the new research results also have…

An example of a structure of PRPP synthase. Figure: Kasper Røjkjær Andersen.
The team's research adorns the cover of Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews. Cover: Kasper Røjkjær Andersen.

2017.01.02 | Research

Survey of knowledge on how to combat microorganisms

A comprehensive knowledge of the synthesis of organisms and the utilisation of the compound PRPP may be useful in efforts to develop methods for combating microorganisms that can infect humans and other mammals. An international research team has now made a complete list of results in the field.

For several years, researchers at Aarhus University have studied the molecular mechanisms that enable bacteria to hide in this way, and new research now suggests that they also make use of code language in their attempt to avoid being controlled. Figure: Ditlev E. Brodersen.
Kirstine Louise Bendtsen, MSc, and PhD student Kehan Xu have carried out the published work.

2016.12.21 | Research

Researchers reveal the secret code language of bacteria

Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a growing global challenge. Danish researchers have now discovered that bacteria use a code language to avoid being controlled. Understanding this code language will be paramount to developing new antibiotics in the future.

2016.12.16 | People

Christmas at MBG Foulum

At the Center for Quantitative Genetics and Genomics, MBG-Foulum, employees have decorated the office hallway with flags. Each flag tells the nationality of the people at the offices on the right and left side of the hallway.

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Bardur Eyjolfsson Ellendersen
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Niraj Shah
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Qualifying exam: Structural and activity analysis of extracellular proteins
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