Researchers discover how bacteria sweet-talk their way into plants

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<strong>Uninfected and infected root nodules</strong>. Uninfected root nodule induced by <em>M. loti</em> bacteria synthesising incompatible exopolysaccharides (left) and infected nitrogen fixing root nodule induced by <em>M. loti</em> bacteria synthesising compatible exopolysaccharides (right). (Figure: Yasuyuki Kawaharada, Aarhus University).
Part of the research team behind the new findings (from left): Yasuyuki Kawaharada, Simon Kelly, Maria Vinther, Mette H. Asmussen og Jens Stougaard (Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen, Aarhus Universitet)

2015.07.08 | Research

Researchers discover how bacteria sweet-talk their way into plants

An international team of researchers has discovered how legumes are able to tell helpful and harmful invading bacteria apart. The research has implications for improving the understanding of how other plants, animals and humans interact with bacteria in their environment and defend themselves against hostile infections. These findings can have…

Nuclear mRNA with a poly(A) tail is normally bound by Nab2, exported to the cytoplasm for translation into proteins and finally turned-over as shown on the left. In the absence of Nab2, the RNA is unprotected and degraded already in the nucleus by exoribonucleases Rrp6 and Dis3. Figure: Manfred Schmid.

2015.06.26 | Research

Surprising new mechanism for gene expression regulation

A new important role for a protein connected to the proper function of neurons has been discovered by a research group from MBG, Aarhus University. The studies shed new light on gene expression regulation and may ultimately lead to an understanding of how neurological defects occur when this protein is mutated.

The figure shows nodules colonised by the symbiont (in green) and by the endophyte (red). Both symbionts and endophytes get access into the nodule via infection threads induced by the symbiont. The endophyte colonises efficiently intra and intercellular spaces of the nodule.

2015.06.22 | Research

Legumes control infection of nodules by both symbiotic and endophytic bacteria

New research results show that legume plants selectively regulate access and accommodation of both symbiotic and endophytic bacteria inside root nodule. This provides a solid basis and platform for identification and selection of beneficial endophytic bacteria and highly efficient nitrogen-fixing rhizobia to be used as biofertilisers in…

Bjørn Panyella Pedersen (Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen)
Four recipients of ST Awards 2015 together with the dean. Pictured from left are Peter Frank Tehrani (ST Education Award 2015), Dean Niels Chr. Nielsen, Inga Jensen Mumm (ST TAP Award 2015), Esben Auken (ST Industrial Collaboration Award 2015) and Bjørn Panyella Pedersen (ST Science Award 2015). Mie Birkbak (ST Talent Award 2015) was on a research period abroad. (Photo: Peter Gammelby, ST Communication).

2015.06.22 | Awards

Bjørn Panyella Pedersen receives ST Science Award 2015

Every year in June, ST selects six people to receive an award in recognition of their great efforts – generally and during the year that has passed – and Bjørn Panyella Pedersen from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics receives ST Science Award.

2015.06.10 | Grant

Nine researchers from MBG receive grants from the Danish Council for Independent Research

Rune Hartmann, Gregers Rom Andersen, Claus Oxvig, Daniel Otzen, Lene Niemann Nejsum, Esben Skipper Sørensen, Jørgen Kjems and Ebbe Sloth Andersen have all received a large grant from the Danish Council for Independent Research.

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Tue 04 Aug
10:00-12:00 | Meeting room 2, Aarhus university
Qualifying exam: Andres Chana Munoz: Evolution of proteolytic enzymes among chordates
Thu 06 Aug
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Revised 2015.07.28

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