Identifying mechanism that repairs damage to our genome

  • Read about the new research results in Science

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During DNA replication, single-stranded breaks in the genome will be converted to double strand breaks. Such breaks are normally repaired by a very imprecise mechanism, which may incorporate mistakes in the genome (here shown as red stretches of DNA). To avoid too many mutations, a nuclease called Mus81 acts at these positions to decrease the distance, where the imprecise mechanism is used (Photo: Colourbox; drawing: Lotte Bjergbæk)

2015.08.24 | Research

Identifying mechanism that repairs damage to our genome

One of the most common forms of damage to our genome is a break in one of our DNA strands. Researchers have now found a mechanism that can repair these breaks naturally and thereby help to suppress the development of cancer.

Figure A. Methyl phosphate. B. Methyl phosphonate. Phosphonate compounds are characterised by a direct link between carbon (C) and phosphorus (P), marked with red. C. The molecular structure of the C-P lyase complex (Figure: Ditlev E. Brodersen, Aarhus University)
The Danish research team behind the article in <em>Nature</em>; from left: Bjarne Jochimsen, Lan Bich Van, Morten Kjeldgaard, Paulina Seweryn, Bjarne Hove-Jensen and Ditlev E. Brodersen (Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen, Aarhus University)
The British research team: Lori A. Passmore and Christopher J. Russo (Photo: Martin Phelps, Medical Research Council, Cambridge)

2015.08.17 | Research

Bacteria’s secret weapon against pesticides and antibiotics revealed

Bacteria exhibit extreme adaptability, which makes them capable of surviving in the most inhospitable conditions. New research results produced by Danish and British researchers now reveal the molecular details behind one of the secret weapons used by bacteria in their battle to survive under very nutrient-poor and even toxic conditions.

<strong>Uninfected and infected root nodules</strong>. Uninfected root nodule induced by <em>M. loti</em> bacteria synthesising incompatible exopolysaccharides (left) and infected nitrogen fixing root nodule induced by <em>M. loti</em> bacteria synthesising compatible exopolysaccharides (right). (Figure: Yasuyuki Kawaharada, Aarhus University).
The research team behind the new research results in <em>Nature</em>from Denmark, New Zealand and the USA. (Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen, Aarhus University).

2015.07.08 | Research

Researchers discover how bacteria sweet-talk their way into plants

An international team of researchers has discovered how legumes are able to tell helpful and harmful invading bacteria apart. The research has implications for improving the understanding of how other plants, animals and humans interact with bacteria in their environment and defend themselves against hostile infections. These findings can have…

Nuclear mRNA with a poly(A) tail is normally bound by Nab2, exported to the cytoplasm for translation into proteins and finally turned-over as shown on the left. In the absence of Nab2, the RNA is unprotected and degraded already in the nucleus by exoribonucleases Rrp6 and Dis3. Figure: Manfred Schmid.

2015.06.26 | Research

Surprising new mechanism for gene expression regulation

A new important role for a protein connected to the proper function of neurons has been discovered by a research group from MBG, Aarhus University. The studies shed new light on gene expression regulation and may ultimately lead to an understanding of how neurological defects occur when this protein is mutated.

The figure shows nodules colonised by the symbiont (in green) and by the endophyte (red). Both symbionts and endophytes get access into the nodule via infection threads induced by the symbiont. The endophyte colonises efficiently intra and intercellular spaces of the nodule.

2015.06.22 | Research

Legumes control infection of nodules by both symbiotic and endophytic bacteria

New research results show that legume plants selectively regulate access and accommodation of both symbiotic and endophytic bacteria inside root nodule. This provides a solid basis and platform for identification and selection of beneficial endophytic bacteria and highly efficient nitrogen-fixing rhizobia to be used as biofertilisers in…

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Thu 04 Sep
13:00-15:00 | Building 3130, room 303, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, Aarhus University
Ewa Terczyńska-Dyla: How the genetic background influences our ability to combat hepatitis C virus infection
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Qualifying exam: Zelalem Eshetu Bekalu: Proteinaceous inhibitors of fungal phytases in cereals: significance in feed

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Revised 2015.08.27

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