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New research project may pave the way for a farewell to artificial colours in food



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Based on violet carrots, Danish researchers and a Danish company will make it possible to replace more artificial colours in food with natural colours based on vegetables. The Innovation Fund has invested almost DKK 15 million (around Euro 2 million) in the project (photo: Henrik Brinch-Pedersen/AU)

2019.09.13 | Knowledge exchange

New research project may pave the way for a farewell to artificial colours in food

Based on violet carrots, Henrik Brinch-Pedersen from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and his collaborators will make it possible to replace more artificial colours in food with natural colours based on vegetables. The Innovation Fund has invested almost DKK 15 million (around Euro 2 million) in the project.

The four molecular biologists behind the spin-out company omiics (from left): Yan Yan, Morten Venø, Junyi Su and Susanne Venø (photo: Kenneth Frydensbjerg)

2019.09.06 | Research, Knowledge exchange

Molecular biologists are successful with spin-out company

Four molecular biologists from Aarhus University have started a spin-out company that offers to identify very small differences between biological samples with a special technique. The researchers build on the experience they gained when they were students and postdocs at the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics/iNANO with a special…

Microscopy image of an entire fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster; body outline in green) with a protein central to the smuggling route (Nxf3) shown in red. Image Credit: Daniel Reumann, IMBA.

2019.08.08 | Research

Smuggling route for cells protects DNA from parasites

An international research team has now uncovered new insight into how safety mechanisms keep genetic parasites in check so that they do not damage the genome. In the long term, the results can help to understand and remedy some of the genetic problems in humans, such as low fertility.

Confocal microscopy images showing NICK4-GFP translocation to the nucleus upon perception of nod factors in Lotus japonicus roots. Image: Marcin Nadzieja/AU

2019.07.31 | Research

Scientists identified a new signaling component important for plant symbiosis

A proteomics-based protein-protein interaction study has led to the discovery of proteins that interact with a legume receptor that mediates signal transduction from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. This shows how symbiotic signals from symbiotic bacteria are transmitted upon perception, ultimately leading to their accommodation within the host…