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Commensals associated with plant roots discovered to have host preference, providing clues for selection and design of bioinoculants



News

Image of <em>Arabidopsis</em>  (left) and Lotus <em>Lotus</em> by Ke Tao og Niels Sandal

2021.09.17 | Research

Commensals associated with plant roots discovered to have host preference, providing clues for selection and design of bioinoculants

Researchers from Aarhus University and the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne, Germany have discovered that root commensal bacteria are adapted to their host species, providing them with competitive advantages when applied exogenously and have to invade the existing bacterial community in their native host. This discovery…

The Danish research team behind the article in <em>Nature</em> (from left): Louise Dalskov, Ninna Ahlmann Frederiksen, Rune Hartmann, Andreas Holleufer & Hans Henrik Gad - all from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen.

2021.08.19 | Research

Fruit flies can pave the way for better understanding of the human immune system

The human body's attempt to eradicate invading viruses can eventually become fatal. With the current Covid-19 pandemic, it is in many cases hyperinflammation and cytokine storm caused by the viral infection that kill patients. Perhaps a deeper understanding of the immune system of fruit flies will enable us to develop strategies that slow down the…

Examples of intron retention events in circRNAs and their frequency and length distribution.
From left: Assistant Professor Karim Rahimi (MBG) and Assistant Professor Daniel Dupont (iNANO) (photo: Anne Færch Nielsen)
From left: Professor Jørgen Kjems (MBG and iNANO) and Morten Venø, CEO of Omiics (photo: Anne Færch Nielsen)

2021.08.13 | Research, Knowledge exchange

New long-read sequencing technology reveals the surprising complexity of circular RNAs

A paper from Jørgen Kjems and colleagues published in Nature Communications presents a new method to determine the full-length sequence and isoform variation of a class of RNAs called circular RNAs. The study is conducted in human and mouse brains and shows that many circRNAs exist in a large number of different version and that a special…

Events

Fri 24 Sep
13:15-15:15 | Online via Zoom
PhD defence: Analysis of proteases and inhibitors involved in blood coagulation and fibrinolysis
Katarzyna Kjøge
Tue 28 Sep
15:00-16:00 | Online via Teams
Webinar - Challenges in academic drug discovery
The TTO Business Development is hosting a webinar with two experts in medicinal chemistry and drug discovery - Simon Mcdonald and Richard Hatley from RGDscience, Cambridge.
Wed 29 Sep
15:30-17:00 | Online via Zoom
Nobel Laureate talk: Bruce A. Beutler: Random creation and mitigation of disease
In 2011, Bruce A. Beutler received the Nobel Prize for his discoveries and the contribution they made to our understanding of how the innate immune system is activated. In his presentation he will talk about his research and the paths – and dead ends – which led him to the Nobel Prize. He will also

PhD defences

Katarzyna Kjøge

2021.09.24 | PhD defense

Katarzyna Kjøge: Analysis of proteases and inhibitors involved in blood coagulation and fibrinolysis

PhD defence, Friday 24 September 2021. Katarzyna Kjøge.

Sabine Seeler

2021.09.23 | PhD defense

Sabine Seeler: Do circular RNAs possess a functional role in the nervous system?

PhD defence, Thursday, 23 September 2021, Sabine Seeler