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Researchers discover how plants distinguish beneficial from harmful microbes



News

Scientists have discovered that legumes use small, well-defined motifs in LysM receptors to read signals produced by both pathogenic and symbiotic microbes. These findings in <em>Science</em> have enabled the researchers to reprogram the chitin immune receptor into a symbiotic receptor Figure: Christina Krönauer and Damiano Lironi.

2020.08.06 | Research

Researchers discover how plants distinguish beneficial from harmful microbes

Legume plants know their friends from their enemies, and now we know how they do it at the molecular level. Plants recognize beneficial microbes and keep harmful ones out, which is important for healthy plants production and global food security. Scientists have now discovered how legumes use small, well-defined motifs in receptor proteins to read…

Photo: Colourbox

2020.08.04 | Research

Saving people with COVID-19 by suppressing the immune system

The immune system protects us from attacks from external enemies such as bacteria and viruses, but sometimes the body fights so fiercely against external threats that people die. In COVID-19, the immune system slows the spread of viruses. New research shows that this means that damaged tissue is not repaired in the lungs, which is why many people…

The determination of the crystal structure of an exopolysaccharide receptor gives insight into how plants and microbes communicate and this knowledge can hopefully be used for more sustainable agriculture where microbes have an important role. Figure: Kasper Røjkjær Andersen.

2020.07.30 | Research

Researchers discover a new and unique class of carbohydrate receptors

An international team of researchers led by Aarhus University are the first to determine the crystal structure of an exopolysaccharide receptor. The results give insight into how plants and microbes communicate, and this knowledge can hopefully be used for more sustainable agriculture where microbes play an important role.

Virofight will develop shell-forming nanoparticles that enclose and neutralize viruses. (Ill.: Hendrik Dietz, Technical University of Munich)
Virofight is supported by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 funding program with 3.88 million Euro.

2020.07.13 | Grant

New research collaboration will develop nano shells that encapsulate and fight virus particles

Professor Jørgen Kjems and the consortium Virofight has received funding from the EU FET-OPEN program to advance novel antiviral treatment. Instead of targeting virus-specific proteins or enzymes by small molecules as done by current antivirals, the Virofight project will develop DNA-based nano-shells that engulf and neutralize entire viruses.…

Events

Wed 12 Aug
09:00-15:00 | The symposium will take place as a virtual event
MBG Young Investigator Symposium 2020
Wed 19 Aug
15:00-17:00 | iNano foyer, building 1590
Welcome reception for Dean Kristian Pedersen
The university invites partners, staff and students to a welcome reception for Dean Kristian Pedersen 19 August 2020.
Thu 27 Aug
09:00-13:00 | Sandbjerg Estate
PhD conference

PhD defences

Søren Fjelstrup

2020.06.29 | PhD defense

Søren Fjelstrup: Using an artificial tongue to detect cancer

PhD defence, Monday 29 June 2020, Søren Fjelstrup.