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Fruit flies help in the development of personalised medicine



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The fruit fly (<em>Drosophila melanogaster</em>) is a fantastic model organism, which has contributed to major scientific breakthroughs (photo: Torsten Nygård Kristensen, Aalborg University)
Up to three-quarters of all identified human disease genes are found in a similar version in the fruit fly, and there is also a high degree of similarity between the nervous system of humans and insects (photo: Aalborg University)

2019.10.09 | Research

Fruit flies help in the development of personalised medicine

It is common knowledge that there is a connection between our genes and the risk of developing certain diseases. In a study on fruit flies, researchers from Aarhus University and Aalborg University have found that gene mapping can also be used to predict response to a given treatment. This knowledge is crucial for the development of personalised…

Photo: Colourbox

2019.10.03 | Research

Flood-tolerant crops for the future climate

A flood can ruin a potato harvest in just 24 hours. However, by understanding the plant's defence mechanisms against flooding, it is possible to create more flood-tolerant crops that can withstand flooding. An international research team with the participation of Associate Professor Kim Hebelstrup from the Department of Molecular Biology and…

In an international collaboration, researchers from Aarhus University have now presented a completely new, ground-breaking model for the integration and incorporation of cholesterol into cells. Figure: Bjørn Panyella Pedersen/AU.

2019.09.19 | Research

Rethinking how cholesterol is integrated into cells

Cholesterol is best known in connection with cardiovascular disease, but cholesterol is also vital for many fundamental processes in the body. In an international collaboration, researchers from Aarhus University have now presented a completely new, ground-breaking model for the integration and incorporation of cholesterol into cells, with great…

Based on violet carrots, Danish researchers and a Danish company will make it possible to replace more artificial colours in food with natural colours based on vegetables. The Innovation Fund has invested almost DKK 15 million (around Euro 2 million) in the project (photo: Henrik Brinch-Pedersen/AU)

2019.09.13 | Knowledge exchange

New research project may pave the way for a farewell to artificial colours in food

Based on violet carrots, Henrik Brinch-Pedersen from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and his collaborators will make it possible to replace more artificial colours in food with natural colours based on vegetables. The Innovation Fund has invested almost DKK 15 million (around Euro 2 million) in the project.