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Research in the media

Kasper Røjkjær Andersen receives DKK 5M to study plant receptors and calcium signal decoding proteins

Associate Professor Kasper Røjkjær Andersen has been granted a Carlsberg Foundation Young Researcher Fellowship for three years to study the structure and function of receptors and calcium decoders at the Department of Molecularbiology and Genetics, Aarhus University.

Researchers discover how plant receptors proofread signals from symbiotic bacteria

An international team led by researchers from Aarhus University have discovered how plant receptors recognize specific carbohydrate signaling molecules from their bacterial symbionts. This ability enables the plant to select and accommodate nitrogen-fixing bacteria inside their roots. 

Top 5 science result in 2020: Signal molecules are the key to less use of fertilisers

Results published in Science from Aarhus University describe how legumes pick up special signalling molecules to distinguish between harmful and beneficial microbes. These results have been nominated by the Danish technical news journal “Ingeniøren” (the Engineer) as being among the five most important results in Denmark in 2020.

Researchers discover how plants distinguish beneficial from harmful microbes

Legume plants know their friends from their enemies, and now we know how they do it at the molecular level. Plants recognize beneficial microbes and keep harmful ones out, which is important for healthy plants production and global food security. Scientists have now discovered how legumes use small, well-defined motifs in receptor proteins to read molecular signals produced by both pathogenic and symbiotic microbes. These remarkable findings have enabled the researchers to reprogram immune receptors into symbiotic receptors, which is the first milestone for engineering symbiotic nitrogen-fixing symbiosis into cereal crops.

Researchers discover a new and unique class of carbohydrate receptors

An international team of researchers led by Aarhus University are the first to determine the crystal structure of an exopolysaccharide receptor. The results give insight into how plants and microbes communicate, and this knowledge can hopefully be used for more sustainable agriculture where microbes play an important role..

Molecular Velcro helps to assemble functional nuclear pore complexes

An international research team now explains how one of the largest molecular machineries - the nuclear pore complex – is being assembled using natively unfolded FG-repeats as molecular Velcro.


Llama-derived nanobodies as a new tool in solving crystal structure

Aarhus University scientists have developed miniature antibodies (nanobodies) that can be labelled on certain amino acids. This provides a direct route for solving new X-ray crystal structures of protein complexes important for gaining mechanistic understanding of cellular processes, which is important in the development of drugs.


Structural knowledge of the DNA repair complex

New Danish research provides mechanistic insight into how DNA is monitored and repaired if damage occurs. The results may eventually help to improve the treatment of certain types of cancer, as the DNA repair complex provides a mechanism for cancer cells to resist chemotherapy.

Structural knowledge of the DNA repair complex New Danish research provides mechanistic insight into how DNA is monitored and repaired if damage occurs. The results may eventually help to improve the treatment of certain types of cancer, as the DNA repair complex provides a mechanism for cancer cells to resist chemotherapy.


Survey of knowledge on how to combat microorganisms

A comprehensive knowledge of the synthesis of organisms and the utilisation of the compound PRPP may be useful in efforts to develop methods for combating microorganisms that can infect humans and other mammals. An international research team has now made a complete list of results in the field.

Survey of knowledge on how to combat microorganisms A comprehensive knowledge of the synthesis of organisms and the utilisation of the compound PRPP may be useful in efforts to develop methods for combating microorganisms that can infect humans and other mammals. An international research team has now made a complete list of results in the field.